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kusama pyjamas

Submit   gender + art If blogs were mullets, this would be the party at the back where I aggregate anything to do with gender in arts, pop culture and my favorite, queer feminist art. Less a blog than a visual scrapbook/experiment in linking creators and audiences. For the business at the front of sharing art that might interest queer, feminist, womanist, sex radical, genderqueer, transgender, whoever creatives: please click on the pink above.

Titled for Yayoi Kusama, who is the cat's pyjamas.


nudgeit:

Lily Myers - “Shrinking Women” (CUPSI 2013)

TW: eating disorders. 

— 3 months ago with 3 notes
#poetry  #feminist poetry  #ED  #lily myers  #family dynamics  #shrinking women  #taking up space 

two-browngirls:

AMRITA PRITAM (1919 - 2005) 

A literary legend of Punjab, Amrita Pritam is a true BROWNGIRL inspiration. The great writer produced over 100 books of poems, essays, novels, folk songs and biographies across a career spanning six decades. 

Loved on both sides of the India-Pakistan border, one of her most famous poems was ‘Ajj Aakhan Waris Shah Nu - Today I invoke Waris Shah’ about the anguish she felt for the violence and trauma during the Partition of 1947. 

She became one of the most important voices for Punjabi women and received a number of the highest national awards for her incredible works. 

ਅੱਜ ਆਖਾਂ ਵਾਰਸ ਸ਼ਾਹ ਨੂੰ ਕਿਤੋਂ ਕਬਰਾਂ ਵਿਚੋਂ ਬੋਲ। 
ਤੇ ਅੱਜ ਕਿਤਾਬੇ ਇਸ਼ਕ ਦਾ ਕੋਈ ਅਗਲਾ ਵਰਕਾ ਫੋਲ। 
ਇਕ ਰੋਈ ਸੀ ਧੀ ਪੰਜਾਬ ਦੀ ਤੂ ਲਿਖ ਲਿਖ ਮਾਰੇ ਵੈਣ 
ਅਜ ਲੱਖਾਂ ਧੀਆਂ ਰੌਂਦੀਆਂ ਤੈਨੂ ਵਾਰਸਸ਼ਾਹ ਨੂੰ ਕਹਿਣ: 
ਵੇ ਦਰਦਮੰਦਾਂ ਦਿਆ ਦਰਦੀਆ ਉੱਠ ਤੱਕ ਆਪਣਾ ਪੰਜਾਬ। 
ਅਜ ਬੇਲੇ ਲਾਸ਼ਾਂ ਵਿਛੀਆਂ ਤੇ ਲਹੂ ਦੀ ਭਰੀ ਚਨਾਬ 

Today, I call Waris Shah, “Speak from your grave” And turn, today, the book of love’s next affectionate page Once, a daughter of Punjab cried and you wrote a wailing saga Today, a million daughters, cry to you, Waris Shah Rise! O’ narrator of the grieving; rise! look at your Punjab Today, fields are lined with corpses, and blood fills the Chenab. 

- S

(Source: poemhunter.com, via feminismandhappiness)

— 3 months ago with 437 notes
#poetry  #women poets  #punjabi women  #Amrita Pritam  #writing  #novelits  #QWOC  #history of literature 

lordbyronsbloomers:

Women’s History Month: March 3, Warsan Shire

Warsan Shire is a London-based, Kenyan-born, Somali writer whose powerful poetry has left me blown away each time I read it. In her book of poetry “Teaching My Mother How to Give Birth” Shire explores the relationship of women’s bodies to war and displacement. 

Some of my favorite poems by Shire are “I’m Not Sad” and “For Women Who Are Difficult to Love.”

Check out this interview if you’d like to learn more. If you’re a writer or  poet or someone who just enjoys being knocked off your feet by words, read all the poetry!

“If our secrets are secrets because we are told to be ashamed, then we must share them.”

(via nuestrahermana)

— 8 months ago with 7124 notes
#poetry  #artist profile  #warsan shire  #WOC  #artist interview 
(via glitter tongue | queer and trans love poems.)
Glitter Tongue is an online collection of love poems by thirty queer and trans poets…. It grew out of a collective writing effort among Margaret Rhee, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, Tamiko Beyer, Oliver Bendorf, Meg Day, and Ching-In Chen, and then expanded to community. This is the result. We invite you to read on for poetic introductions and then explore the poems collected here.

(via glitter tongue | queer and trans love poems.)

Glitter Tongue is an online collection of love poems by thirty queer and trans poets…. It grew out of a collective writing effort among Margaret Rhee, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, Tamiko Beyer, Oliver Bendorf, Meg Day, and Ching-In Chen, and then expanded to community. This is the result. We invite you to read on for poetic introductions and then explore the poems collected here.

— 9 months ago with 7 notes
#poetry  #queer  #trans*  #online anthology 
Jennifer Hodges, Green Planet, Ink and acrylic on paper, 22×28.5. Courtesy of the artist.
Miranda Field and Julia Guez have been corresponding since January 2010. This is the transcript of their conversation which touches on insomnia, motherhood, and “living on the wrong side of the river.”
Like many of the contributors to the vital Not For Mothers Only anthology (Fence Books, 2007), Field has received some attention for the ways she has since learned to reconcile the demands of both parenting and cultural production. To borrow from Alicia Ostriker’s introduction to the anthology, it is very clear to me how Field’s life and work “bespeaks both the power of maternity in bending us to its will, and the power of the artist to resist-while-submitting.” (via BOMBLOG: The School of Homesickness by Julia Guez)

Jennifer Hodges, Green Planet, Ink and acrylic on paper, 22×28.5. Courtesy of the artist.

Miranda Field and Julia Guez have been corresponding since January 2010. This is the transcript of their conversation which touches on insomnia, motherhood, and “living on the wrong side of the river.”

Like many of the contributors to the vital Not For Mothers Only anthology (Fence Books, 2007), Field has received some attention for the ways she has since learned to reconcile the demands of both parenting and cultural production. To borrow from Alicia Ostriker’s introduction to the anthology, it is very clear to me how Field’s life and work “bespeaks both the power of maternity in bending us to its will, and the power of the artist to resist-while-submitting.” (via BOMBLOG: The School of Homesickness by Julia Guez)

— 9 months ago with 1 note
#poetry  #motherhood  #artist interview 
abstrackafricana:

tumblr bell hooks fans:
Wild Fig Books will be hosting a signing for bell hooks on Nov. 19th as she promotes her new poetry collection, Appalachian Elegy. If you would like to prepay to reserve a signed copy to be mailed to you or a loved one, then please message us at wildfigbooks@gmail.com, or through facebook.com/thewildfigbooks or call us at the store at 859-381-8133. The book is 80 pages with 66 poems and is $19.95 + .06% state sales tax and $2.29 domestic shipping ($23.44 total). Books will be sent out  November 20-21. Please feel free to email us if you have any questions.

abstrackafricana:

tumblr bell hooks fans:

Wild Fig Books will be hosting a signing for bell hooks on Nov. 19th as she promotes her new poetry collection, Appalachian Elegy. If you would like to prepay to reserve a signed copy to be mailed to you or a loved one, then please message us at wildfigbooks@gmail.com, or through facebook.com/thewildfigbooks or call us at the store at 859-381-8133. The book is 80 pages with 66 poems and is $19.95 + .06% state sales tax and $2.29 domestic shipping ($23.44 total). Books will be sent out  November 20-21. Please feel free to email us if you have any questions.

— 1 year ago with 61 notes
#bell hooks  #OMG  #writing  #poetry  #wild fig books 
creepshots

anneboyer:

 a poem for Michael Brutsch

a photo which, when masturbated to, makes a man’s dick fall off

a photo which, when looked at, makes a man’s dick fall off

a body which, when looked at, makes a man’s dick fall off

a photo which explodes like a grenade

a body which explodes like a grenade

any manner of weaponized bodies, both self-destructing and self-preservative, like a body like a poison garment (shirt of nessus), like a body like a horse full of soldiers, like a body like a collapsing ship  (nero) 

a body like a land-mine which requires only a little treading-on to trigger

a girl or a woman like a land-mine who requires only a little treading-on to trigger

a girl or a woman who requires only a little photographing to trigger

a photo which, when when masturbated to, will make a man go blind

a photo which, when masturbated to, will both make a man go blind and put in the place of his sight a grim and hellish inner vision

a photo which when circulated on the internet has some code in it, and the code is of the nature “whoever circulates this image will now be cursed like Job”

a series of techno-temporal-biological viruses which open the guts of these men so that the warmth of some human viscera can serve as incubation space for some now-still-embryonic future in which girls and women exist fully and freely with their bodies without the fear of men 

a series of techno-temporal-biological viruses which give us time and love and friends enough to work on this future/ work these problems out

a series of viruses which creates any productive use for the viscera of these men including more minor ones, like growing oranges  

a computer screen filter which filters arousal, replacing it with one of the following feelings: fear, shame, confusion, regret, diminishment, dysphoria  

a computer screen filter which filters arousal, leaving — upon looking at the internet — only the impulse to vacuum the floor

— 1 year ago with 92 notes
#anne boyer  #creepshots  #digital culture  #poetry  #the gaze  #weaponized bodies  #feminism  #feminist art 
an online collection of queer love poems just launched today! Brilliant queers including the lovely femmes of colour Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, and Kim Katrin Crosby, and so many others. →

Glitter Tongue is an online collection of love poems by thirty queer and trans poets, launching Valentines Day 2012. It grew out of a collective writing effort among Margaret Rhee, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, Tamiko Beyer, Oliver Bendorf, Meg Day, and Ching-In Chen, and then expanded to community. This is the result. We invite you to read on for poetic introductions and then explore the poems collected here.

(Source: bravenewgirls, via etiquette-etc)

— 2 years ago with 338 notes
#love  #romantic ideals  #LGBTI  #poetry  #art  #queer  #transgender 

dishabillic:

“Nebraska” by Miles Walser

For years you hid your tampons between mattresses, cut your hair short, lowered your voice, collected ace bandages and baggy clothes. Small town talk stuck to your shoulders, you nervously shuffled around gas stations, never looked men in the eyes. We share unwanted wombs. While mine collects cobwebs, yours lies in a coffin in Nebraska.

This is the state that made you famous, handed movie scripts to Hilary Swank. Your murder was Oscar worthy. We are walking obituaries. Your hate crime headline already carved across my forehead, people look at me and see your delicate hands and absent adam’s apple.

Brother, I’m afraid to use the bathroom… (Walk in, head down, don’t look at another guy.) I’m afraid I’ll be discovered… (Don’t talk, dont stare, don’t piss too quickly.) Some thick armed man will call me a queer, tell me to show him my tits. Suddenly I’m thrown against faucets, spit in my face, workboot gutting my stomach. I see you on the movie screen and wonder if it’s my reflection. I watch them push you into the dirt and drag me into their car as they break our bodies in between our thighs.

Brother, did it hurt when you kissed her goodbye? Did you know you were breaking your promise when you told her you’d come back? Did your parents panic? Buy you a prom dress? Struggle over pronouns at family gatherings? And how long did it take your girlfriend to run her hands along your skin, soft as hers? Did she leave her eyes open?

We are carcasses. Untouched boxes of condoms. We are public secrets, playground jokes, and horror films. We are costumes, stuffing, binding and makeup. We aren’t real men to them. Invisible til we’re screaming. They don’t remember our names until they read them on our tombstones.

They exposed you. Decided you’re better off as splattered ink on newspaper. Used you as a warning for the rest of us. And there are days when it works. Sometimes I forget that sidewalks can be safe. Sometimes I confuse their shooting eyes for the bullet that met yours. Sometimes I imagine the phone call my mother would get. Can almost hear my sobbing friends. Smell the lillies on my casket. Touch my girlfriend’s black dress. But brother, I am trying to be brave.

(via catiebat)

— 2 years ago with 547 notes
#poetry  #transgender  #rural queers  #miles walser  #brave 
blkcowrie:

hope you’ll consider following my poetry/creative writing blog at:http://blkcowrie.wordpress.com ♥ ~ just scroll to the bottom of the screen and press follow. thx!

blkcowrie:

hope you’ll consider following my poetry/creative writing blog at:

http://blkcowrie.wordpress.com ♥ ~ just scroll to the bottom of the screen and press follow. thx!

(via blkcowrie)

— 2 years ago with 107 notes
#poetry  #writing  #blkcowrie  #art  #artists 

blkcowrie:

Nikky Finney reads “Penguin Mullet Bread” (by KYwriters)

— 2 years ago with 2 notes
#poetry  #authors  #Nikky Finney  #art  #women artists  #penguins! 
I am not sure how to convey the power of this poetry collection. I can tell you that once I picked up Love Cake, I could not put it down until I finished every poem, even though I sometimes had to read through my tears. Upon finishing, I immediately had to call a femme friend to read her a poem that reminded me of her.
These poems demand that I feel everything more intensely–including grief and rage–but in return, they give me back something I didn’t know I was missing: an expansive sense of possibility. The morning after I read this collection, I woke up from my sleep with a feeling of anticipation, remembering that I had been given an unexpectedly precious gift that I will carry deep inside me. The gift of this poetry collection is nothing less than a roadmap to what liberation can look like for queer people who survive personal and collective trauma.
Describing border crossings that she experiences as a queer working class person of color, Leah Laskshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha gives voice to the involuntary incursions on her body: child abuse, colonialism, racism, and war; as well as her voluntary crossings of boundaries: leaving her family of origin, rediscovering her roots in Sri Lanka, and reclaiming her body. She maintains a tension between oppression and healing throughout, in poems that leave no doubt about her power as a survivor, healer, and activist.
via Tikkun Daily Blog » Blog Archive » Recipe for a Revolution with Chipped Turquoise Nails: A Review of Love Cake: Poems by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha)

I am not sure how to convey the power of this poetry collection. I can tell you that once I picked up Love Cake, I could not put it down until I finished every poem, even though I sometimes had to read through my tears. Upon finishing, I immediately had to call a femme friend to read her a poem that reminded me of her.

These poems demand that I feel everything more intensely–including grief and rage–but in return, they give me back something I didn’t know I was missing: an expansive sense of possibility. The morning after I read this collection, I woke up from my sleep with a feeling of anticipation, remembering that I had been given an unexpectedly precious gift that I will carry deep inside me. The gift of this poetry collection is nothing less than a roadmap to what liberation can look like for queer people who survive personal and collective trauma.

Describing border crossings that she experiences as a queer working class person of color, Leah Laskshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha gives voice to the involuntary incursions on her body: child abuse, colonialism, racism, and war; as well as her voluntary crossings of boundaries: leaving her family of origin, rediscovering her roots in Sri Lanka, and reclaiming her body. She maintains a tension between oppression and healing throughout, in poems that leave no doubt about her power as a survivor, healer, and activist.

via Tikkun Daily Blog » Blog Archive » Recipe for a Revolution with Chipped Turquoise Nails: A Review of Love Cake: Poems by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha)

— 2 years ago with 6 notes
#poetry  #leah lakshmi piepzna-samarasinha  #trauma and recovery  #femme  #femme shark 

The poems in Nikky Finney’s breathtaking new collection Head Off & Split sustain a sensitive and intense dialogue with emblematic figures and events in African American life: from civil rights matriarch Rosa Parks to former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice, from a brazen girl strung out on lightning to a terrified woman abandoned on a rooftop during Hurricane Katrina.
Finney’s poetic voice is defined by an intimacy that holds a soft yet exacting eye on the erotic, on uncanny political and family events, like her mother’s wedding waltz with South Carolina senator Strom Thurmond, and then again on the heartbreaking hilarity of an American president’s final State of the Union address. Artful and intense, Finney’s poems ask us to be mindful of what we fraction, fragment, cut off, dice, dishonor, or throw away, powerfully evoking both the lawless and the sublime.

via Write With Your Spine: A Poet Sings: Nikky Finney’s Head Off & Split

The poems in Nikky Finney’s breathtaking new collection Head Off & Split sustain a sensitive and intense dialogue with emblematic figures and events in African American life: from civil rights matriarch Rosa Parks to former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice, from a brazen girl strung out on lightning to a terrified woman abandoned on a rooftop during Hurricane Katrina.

Finney’s poetic voice is defined by an intimacy that holds a soft yet exacting eye on the erotic, on uncanny political and family events, like her mother’s wedding waltz with South Carolina senator Strom Thurmond, and then again on the heartbreaking hilarity of an American president’s final State of the Union address. Artful and intense, Finney’s poems ask us to be mindful of what we fraction, fragment, cut off, dice, dishonor, or throw away, powerfully evoking both the lawless and the sublime.

via Write With Your Spine: A Poet Sings: Nikky Finney’s Head Off & Split

— 2 years ago with 2 notes
#poetry  #the South  #african american  #women  #books  #WOC  #matriarchs  #Nikky Finney 

1700% Project: Mistaken for Muslim (by atomicshogun)

Using the music video format as a subversive tool of engagement and collaboration, artist Anida Yoeu Ali and filmmaker Masahiro Sugano, worked with over 100 diverse volunteers, participants and community members in the Chicagoland area. 

…Central to the video is an unapologetic poem, a response to injustices directed against the Muslim community that reflect both the absurdity and dangers of racially-motivated fears. “1700%” refers to the rate of increase in hate crimes committed against people perceived as Muslim or Arab after 9/11.

— 2 years ago with 6 notes
#anida yoeu ali  #poetry  #interdisciplinary art  #islamophobia  #awesome women  #art