Showing posts tagged eros/thanatos.
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kusama pyjamas

Submit   gender + art If blogs were mullets, this would be the party at the back where I aggregate anything to do with gender in arts, pop culture and my favorite, queer feminist art. Less a blog than a visual scrapbook/experiment in linking creators and audiences. For the business at the front of sharing art that might interest queer, feminist, womanist, sex radical, genderqueer, transgender, whoever creatives: please click on the pink above.

Titled for Yayoi Kusama, who is the cat's pyjamas.



Artist statement from the ‘Frock, Paper, Scissors’ 2010 exhibition by Perth artist Sue Codee, of This Paper Cut Life

I have always been an avid op-shopper. As a young woman in her twenties who was exploring her creative potential, I used to collect vintage dresses and frocks from the 40’s and 50’s, which at the time were easy to find in op-shops. I was attracted to their beauty; their often gracious styles, fabrics and floral designs, and I was able to access another era of femininity in the wearing of them. With motherhood, ‘middle age’, plus the diagnosis of breast cancer in which I am in the middle of treatment, new challenges to femininity arise, and I find myself again attracted to the dress but this time as a potent symbol in my work.

In the “Paper, Scissors, Frock” series I have used the dress as a frame, and in a sense a vessel, in which to contain images of growth, death, life, surrender, and healing, and the internal musings of this particular path on which I find myself. With that playful youthfulness involved in the collecting of those old dresses, that same free spirit is in the making of the papercuts. But a little older and a little wiser. The papercuts play with shadow and spirit. They are crafted around a kitchen table, the centre and heart of the home and family. They are works that deeply resonate with my place in life right now and the knowledge that the feminine will continue to change and evolve over the course of a lifetime.

Sue Codee, 2010

— 3 years ago with 4 notes
#papercut  #art  #feminity  #breast cancer  #fashion  #the body  #eros/thanatos 
“X-Ray of Civilization”: David Wojnarowicz and the Politics of Representation
by Leon Hilton at Bully Bloggers

David Wojnarowicz often said that he wanted his art to be an “X-Ray of civilization.” Eighteen years after his death, at the age of 37, from AIDS-related complications, his work has apparently lost none of its radioactive power. When Martin E. Sullivan, the director of the National Portrait Gallery, caved to demands from the Catholic League and several prominent Republican congressmen—including soon-to-be House Speaker John Boehner—to remove a video piece by Wojnarowicz from public exhibition …  What might have been dismissed as a wearingly familiar debate about censorship and government funding of the arts has turned out to reveal a lot about the still-uneasy status of queer representation in the national political imaginary.
…
The Catholic League’s Bill Donohue honed in on one image in particular—a shot of a crucifix and wood-carved Christ figure, blood dripping from its wounds, a black smear of swarming ants covering over its prone body. “It would jump out at people if they had ants crawling all over the body of Muhammad,” Donohue protested in an interview with the New York Times, “except that they wouldn’t do it, of course, for obvious reasons.” Shamelessly insisting that the display of this image constituted “hate speech” against Catholics and Christians more broadly, Donohue’s bizarre logic was reiterated by Rep. Eric Cantor, who told Fox News that the display of the video was “an obvious attempt to offend Christians during this Christmas season.” The video was taken down on November 30, the evening before World AIDS Day.
Despite Donohue’s and Cantor’s almost willfully asinine contention that “A Fire in My Belly” is anti-Christian, Wojnarowicz’s video—and indeed his artistic project as a whole—both draws from and radically reconfigures the centuries-old representational tradition of Christian martyrdom in Western art. 

Belated reblog, for this point about the erotic death themes dominant in Christian iconography & early AIDS protest art, especially Wojnarowiczs.

“X-Ray of Civilization”: David Wojnarowicz and the Politics of Representation

by Leon Hilton at Bully Bloggers

David Wojnarowicz often said that he wanted his art to be an “X-Ray of civilization.” Eighteen years after his death, at the age of 37, from AIDS-related complications, his work has apparently lost none of its radioactive power. When Martin E. Sullivan, the director of the National Portrait Gallery, caved to demands from the Catholic League and several prominent Republican congressmen—including soon-to-be House Speaker John Boehner—to remove a video piece by Wojnarowicz from public exhibition …  What might have been dismissed as a wearingly familiar debate about censorship and government funding of the arts has turned out to reveal a lot about the still-uneasy status of queer representation in the national political imaginary.

The Catholic League’s Bill Donohue honed in on one image in particular—a shot of a crucifix and wood-carved Christ figure, blood dripping from its wounds, a black smear of swarming ants covering over its prone body. “It would jump out at people if they had ants crawling all over the body of Muhammad,” Donohue protested in an interview with the New York Times, “except that they wouldn’t do it, of course, for obvious reasons.” Shamelessly insisting that the display of this image constituted “hate speech” against Catholics and Christians more broadly, Donohue’s bizarre logic was reiterated by Rep. Eric Cantor, who told Fox News that the display of the video was “an obvious attempt to offend Christians during this Christmas season.” The video was taken down on November 30, the evening before World AIDS Day.

Despite Donohue’s and Cantor’s almost willfully asinine contention that “A Fire in My Belly” is anti-Christian, Wojnarowicz’s video—and indeed his artistic project as a whole—both draws from and radically reconfigures the centuries-old representational tradition of Christian martyrdom in Western art.

Belated reblog, for this point about the erotic death themes dominant in Christian iconography & early AIDS protest art, especially Wojnarowiczs.

— 3 years ago with 12 notes
#belatedly  #David Wojnarowicz  #eros/thanatos  #HIV/AIDS  #queer  #queer art  #art  #Fruedian Jesus 
curate:

bonesarecoralmade:

Beyond the Blue Sky by Brandt Miller
Mongolia’s  		lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community have long been  		misunderstood and rejected in Mongolian society. Ignorance,  		misunderstanding and intolerance have led to widespread prejudice,  		discrimination and violence. Fear of persecution on simply the basis of  		one’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity has forced many members  		of the LGBT community to hide their true selves, thereby becoming an  		invisible presence in a hostile world. However underground the community  		may be, it is nonetheless a vibrant one, full  		of hope, passion, dreams, and a burning desire to one day gain  		acceptance and recognition. They are your friends, your colleagues, your  		brothers and sisters, sons and daughters.  They share the same goals,  		the same loves, the same triumphs, the same heartaches.
This exhibition  		gives visibility to this largely hidden group within our society, to  		allow them to articulate their life struggles through the medium of art.  		It is the first time in this country’s history that such an exhibition  		has been held, and it would not have been possible without the  		collaboration of the local LGBT community, contributions from national  		and international artists, and support from countless individuals  		committed to social change.
The  		artworks exhibited are designed to challenge traditional notions of  		gender and sexuality and to confront the harsh realities of life facing  		the LGBT community. In order to ensure the safety of the photographic  		subjects, and to also represent the hidden nature of LGBT people’s lives  		and their invisibility in society, their faces have been covered with  		blue scarves known as khadags. The use of the khadag, which  		traditionally covers the faces of those who have died, also symbolically  		mirrors the present reality in which many LGBT people feel they are not  		fully living.
via sexgenderbody + thegang

curate:

bonesarecoralmade:

Beyond the Blue Sky by Brandt Miller

Mongolia’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community have long been misunderstood and rejected in Mongolian society. Ignorance, misunderstanding and intolerance have led to widespread prejudice, discrimination and violence. Fear of persecution on simply the basis of one’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity has forced many members of the LGBT community to hide their true selves, thereby becoming an invisible presence in a hostile world. However underground the community may be, it is nonetheless a vibrant one, full of hope, passion, dreams, and a burning desire to one day gain acceptance and recognition. They are your friends, your colleagues, your brothers and sisters, sons and daughters. They share the same goals, the same loves, the same triumphs, the same heartaches.

This exhibition gives visibility to this largely hidden group within our society, to allow them to articulate their life struggles through the medium of art. It is the first time in this country’s history that such an exhibition has been held, and it would not have been possible without the collaboration of the local LGBT community, contributions from national and international artists, and support from countless individuals committed to social change.

The artworks exhibited are designed to challenge traditional notions of gender and sexuality and to confront the harsh realities of life facing the LGBT community. In order to ensure the safety of the photographic subjects, and to also represent the hidden nature of LGBT people’s lives and their invisibility in society, their faces have been covered with blue scarves known as khadags. The use of the khadag, which traditionally covers the faces of those who have died, also symbolically mirrors the present reality in which many LGBT people feel they are not fully living.

via sexgenderbody + thegang

— 4 years ago with 24 notes
#art  #queer  #LGBT  #Mongolia  #eros/thanatos  #Brandt Miller