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kusama pyjamas

Submit   gender + art If blogs were mullets, this would be the party at the back where I aggregate anything to do with gender in arts and popular culture. mainly queer & feminist art, a smidge of personal favorite artists, the occasional related docos and news. For the business at the front of sharing art that might interest queer, feminist, womanist, genderqueer, transgender, whoever creatives: please click on the pink above.

Titled for Yayoi Kusama, who is the cat's pyjamas.



Wangechi Mutu observes: “Females carry the marks, language and nuances of their culture more than the male. Anything that is desired or despised is always placed on the female body.”
Piecing together magazine imagery with painted surfaces and found materials, Mutu’s collages explore the split nature of cultural identity, referencing colonial history, fashion and contemporary African politics. 

via Wangechi Mutu - Articles - The Saatchi Gallery

Wangechi Mutu observes: “Females carry the marks, language and nuances of their culture more than the male. Anything that is desired or despised is always placed on the female body.”

Piecing together magazine imagery with painted surfaces and found materials, Mutu’s collages explore the split nature of cultural identity, referencing colonial history, fashion and contemporary African politics. 

via Wangechi Mutu - Articles - The Saatchi Gallery

— 2 years ago with 12 notes
#Wangechi Mutu  #the body  #collage  #cultural heritage  #craft  #art 
Q. How much does sexuality, specifically your sexuality as a queer guy, play into your art?
A. My sexuality influences my work a lot and very little sometimes. My work is about desire and because I’m queer it ends up being about queer desire. I’m more interested in how culturally we are marketed images of heteronormative relationships. We see movie posters or magazine covers or billboards that feature men and women exhibiting our primary markers of love, romance and relationships. My work seeks to deconstruct that mainstream imagery and open it up for a queer cultural dialogue, not so much a sexual dialogue.
Q. For people who aren’t familiar already, could you explain what craft/material studies is all about?
A. Craft is making anything by hand. Which gives it a pretty distinguished place in the digital age. There‘s an incredibly rich history of traditional craft textiles that I’m interested in and influenced by but those processes don’t really make their way into my own work.
Q. Where did the inspiration for your “Peepholes” series come from? Can you tell us about that?
A. I came across these awesome vintage images of men together in a book. I got interested in the layers of information involved in looking at them. One could extrapolate that these men are gay and that they are queer artifacts, but the images could also be representative of an intimacy between straight men of the time, that we don’t experience today.
I imagined these pictures as something of a peephole, through which we could look and gather idiosyncratic notions about identity, but through which we don’t get the whole picture, only bits and pieces. With this work, I wanted to provide the viewer a voyeuristic experience, where they could only see bits of these mens’ relationships.
via Richmond artist Aaron McIntosh brings us queer culture

Q. How much does sexuality, specifically your sexuality as a queer guy, play into your art?

A. My sexuality influences my work a lot and very little sometimes. My work is about desire and because I’m queer it ends up being about queer desire. I’m more interested in how culturally we are marketed images of heteronormative relationships. We see movie posters or magazine covers or billboards that feature men and women exhibiting our primary markers of love, romance and relationships. My work seeks to deconstruct that mainstream imagery and open it up for a queer cultural dialogue, not so much a sexual dialogue.

Q. For people who aren’t familiar already, could you explain what craft/material studies is all about?

A. Craft is making anything by hand. Which gives it a pretty distinguished place in the digital age. There‘s an incredibly rich history of traditional craft textiles that I’m interested in and influenced by but those processes don’t really make their way into my own work.

Q. Where did the inspiration for your “Peepholes” series come from? Can you tell us about that?

A. I came across these awesome vintage images of men together in a book. I got interested in the layers of information involved in looking at them. One could extrapolate that these men are gay and that they are queer artifacts, but the images could also be representative of an intimacy between straight men of the time, that we don’t experience today.

I imagined these pictures as something of a peephole, through which we could look and gather idiosyncratic notions about identity, but through which we don’t get the whole picture, only bits and pieces. With this work, I wanted to provide the viewer a voyeuristic experience, where they could only see bits of these mens’ relationships.

via Richmond artist Aaron McIntosh brings us queer culture

— 2 years ago with 5 notes
#craft  #peepholes  #queer  #art  #Aaron McIntosh 

In an email conversation, I asked Josh about the place of queerness in contemporary craft. He wrote, “Recently, I’ve heard discussions that suggest that the site of queerness in fact, no longer resides in the body. But instead, it exists immaterially or spiritually, like a specter that has the ability to haunt culture.”
via Fiber Art: The Queer Kid on the Bus | SanArt

Artist is Josh Faught. Love his work with textiles on cultural memory and the popular - yet still outsider - nature of queers, feminism and the craft based arts.

In an email conversation, I asked Josh about the place of queerness in contemporary craft. He wrote, “Recently, I’ve heard discussions that suggest that the site of queerness in fact, no longer resides in the body. But instead, it exists immaterially or spiritually, like a specter that has the ability to haunt culture.”

via Fiber Art: The Queer Kid on the Bus | SanArt

Artist is Josh Faught. Love his work with textiles on cultural memory and the popular - yet still outsider - nature of queers, feminism and the craft based arts.

— 4 years ago with 2 notes
#fibre art  #queer art  #art  #favorite  #the body  #craft 
Hilobrow | Middlebrow is not the solution

Margaret Wertheim is an Aus­tralian-born science writer who — along with her sister, the poet and critic Christine Wertheim — cofounded the Institute for Figuring, a Los Angeles-based organization “dedicated to the poetic and aesthetic dimensions of science, mathematics and the technical arts.”
In 2005, the Wertheims launched the Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef Project in their Highland Park living room; in 2010, the now-massive sculpture will be exhibited at the Smithsonian. From the beginning, the Wertheims imagined the project as a collective enterprise — but they had no idea how far it would spread. Hilobrow.com’s Joshua Glenn interviewed Margaret Wertheim in January 2010…
GLENN: Do you think women are more attracted to collaborative projects than men are?
WERTHEIM: In terms of the collective group enterprise, women have been having sewing circles and quilting bees since the dawn of time. Some critics have argued, with good cause, that the collective feminist art projects of the early 1970s — like the 1972 installation “Womanhouse” — were the start of this whole trend that is now called Relational Aesthetics, which is to say artistic practices that take as their point of departure human relations as opposed to a solo genius, and which has been taken up by many men.

Hilobrow | Middlebrow is not the solution

Margaret Wertheim is an Aus­tralian-born science writer who — along with her sister, the poet and critic Christine Wertheim — cofounded the Institute for Figuring, a Los Angeles-based organization “dedicated to the poetic and aesthetic dimensions of science, mathematics and the technical arts.”

In 2005, the Wertheims launched the Hyperbolic Crochet Coral Reef Project in their Highland Park living room; in 2010, the now-massive sculpture will be exhibited at the Smithsonian. From the beginning, the Wertheims imagined the project as a collective enterprise — but they had no idea how far it would spread. Hilobrow.com’s Joshua Glenn interviewed Margaret Wertheim in January 2010…

GLENN: Do you think women are more attracted to collaborative projects than men are?

WERTHEIM: In terms of the collective group enterprise, women have been having sewing circles and quilting bees since the dawn of time. Some critics have argued, with good cause, that the collective feminist art projects of the early 1970s — like the 1972 installation “Womanhouse” — were the start of this whole trend that is now called Relational Aesthetics, which is to say artistic practices that take as their point of departure human relations as opposed to a solo genius, and which has been taken up by many men.

— 4 years ago with 34 notes
#Crochet!!  #science  #feminist art  #relational aesthetics  #craft  #Margaret Wertheim  #green art  #craftivism 
TRACKS: ALLYSON MITCHELL, RADICAL CRAFT - The Brooklyn Rail
What was at first a response to the gleaming lipstick lesbians of Hollywood as showcased in The L Word, among other lesbian-chic forums, has developed into a practice paralleling her interest in the politics of bodies, bodies of size, fat acceptance, and body acceptance. “I wanted to see bigger, hairier, fatter, sexier bodies,” she said.
So, in 2004 she began making a series of sculptures titled Ladies Sasquatch, hairy plush stuffed animals rendered twice the size of her body. With the intent of “claiming more space,” and energized by the positive response she’s been getting from young queer women, she wants to realize a house-size installation after she completes the storefront window project. “My art practice is kind of a fireball,” she remarks, “fed by the oxygen around it.”

TRACKS: ALLYSON MITCHELL, RADICAL CRAFT - The Brooklyn Rail

What was at first a response to the gleaming lipstick lesbians of Hollywood as showcased in The L Word, among other lesbian-chic forums, has developed into a practice paralleling her interest in the politics of bodies, bodies of size, fat acceptance, and body acceptance. “I wanted to see bigger, hairier, fatter, sexier bodies,” she said.

So, in 2004 she began making a series of sculptures titled Ladies Sasquatch, hairy plush stuffed animals rendered twice the size of her body. With the intent of “claiming more space,” and energized by the positive response she’s been getting from young queer women, she wants to realize a house-size installation after she completes the storefront window project. “My art practice is kind of a fireball,” she remarks, “fed by the oxygen around it.”

— 4 years ago with 2 notes
#allyson mitchell  #craft  #queer  #dyke  #feminist art  #body positive  #sculpture 
paper n stitch – Sweet Bestiary Interview - A daily dose of handmade, design, and style inspiration
Paper and Stitch interview with Flor of Sweet Bestiary, who makes these tiny puppets that I’m totally infatuated with.
-How long have you been pursuing work as an artist?
To be honest, it would be easier to answer how long I have not been pursuing that: 20 years (I’m 32 now). I gave up being an artist when I was 12. It was for two reasons: I saw a lot of people more talented than I was -and- I knew my intellectual skills were better than my artistic ones. Both arguments are true even today. But: instead of comparing myself with those enormously virtuous artists, I admire, learn and am inspired by them. And I feel happier making puppets than teaching Semiotics at University.

paper n stitch – Sweet Bestiary Interview - A daily dose of handmade, design, and style inspiration

Paper and Stitch interview with Flor of Sweet Bestiary, who makes these tiny puppets that I’m totally infatuated with.

-How long have you been pursuing work as an artist?
To be honest, it would be easier to answer how long I have not been pursuing that: 20 years (I’m 32 now). I gave up being an artist when I was 12. It was for two reasons: I saw a lot of people more talented than I was -and- I knew my intellectual skills were better than my artistic ones. Both arguments are true even today. But: instead of comparing myself with those enormously virtuous artists, I admire, learn and am inspired by them. And I feel happier making puppets than teaching Semiotics at University.
— 4 years ago with 1 note
#puppets  #interview  #art  #craft  #inspiration  #Sweet Bestiary 
grrl+dog: knit a tit for International Women’s Day

Get the pattern here - it’s free on Knitty.Devised by a woman who needed asofter alternative after a mastectomy.Now she makes and sells them all over.And since breasts come in all shapes and sizes,then making a mistake on the patternwill simply customize it.I’m aiming for some stretch marks on mine.

Grrl + Dog is my favorite craft revival feminist friendly kind of blog atm. Whenever I’m feeling a bit ugh about the romanticization of women’s confinement in the domestic sphere and general class ignorance in faux-green, faux-feminist kinds of analysis of the craft revival, I read Grrl + Dog and am reminded of all the cool ladies who get it.

grrl+dog: knit a tit for International Women’s Day

Get the pattern here - it’s free on Knitty.
Devised by a woman who needed a
softer alternative after a mastectomy.
Now she makes and sells them all over.

And since breasts come in all shapes and sizes,
then making a mistake on the pattern
will simply customize it.
I’m aiming for some stretch marks on mine.

Grrl + Dog is my favorite craft revival feminist friendly kind of blog atm. Whenever I’m feeling a bit ugh about the romanticization of women’s confinement in the domestic sphere and general class ignorance in faux-green, faux-feminist kinds of analysis of the craft revival, I read Grrl + Dog and am reminded of all the cool ladies who get it.

— 4 years ago with 9 notes
#feminist art  #IWD  #bloggers  #craft  #breasts  #patterns