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kusama pyjamas

Submit   gender + art If blogs were mullets, this would be the party at the back where I aggregate anything to do with gender in arts and popular culture. mainly queer & feminist art, a smidge of personal favorite artists, the occasional related docos and news. For the business at the front of sharing art that might interest queer, feminist, womanist, genderqueer, transgender, whoever creatives: please click on the pink above.

Titled for Yayoi Kusama, who is the cat's pyjamas.


boystown:

Jo Spence - How do I Begin to Take Responsibility for my Body? (1985)

Weird, this was a favorite years ago when I was more into feminist body politics zine culture …but I really strongly remembered it as having only the colour images on green, the fragmented parts without the central whole portrait.

boystown:

Jo Spence - How do I Begin to Take Responsibility for my Body? (1985)

Weird, this was a favorite years ago when I was more into feminist body politics zine culture …but I really strongly remembered it as having only the colour images on green, the fragmented parts without the central whole portrait.

— 3 years ago with 35 notes
#Jo Spence  #breast cancer  #self portrait  #feminist art  #the body 
ilikeartalot:

San Francisco-based photographer Kerry Mansfield was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005, and photographed this series of self-portraits during her treatment.

ilikeartalot:

San Francisco-based photographer Kerry Mansfield was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005, and photographed this series of self-portraits during her treatment.

(via lipstick-feminists)

— 3 years ago with 5137 notes
#breast cancer  #Kerry Mansfield  #self portraits  #the body  #feminist art 


Artist statement from the ‘Frock, Paper, Scissors’ 2010 exhibition by Perth artist Sue Codee, of This Paper Cut Life

I have always been an avid op-shopper. As a young woman in her twenties who was exploring her creative potential, I used to collect vintage dresses and frocks from the 40’s and 50’s, which at the time were easy to find in op-shops. I was attracted to their beauty; their often gracious styles, fabrics and floral designs, and I was able to access another era of femininity in the wearing of them. With motherhood, ‘middle age’, plus the diagnosis of breast cancer in which I am in the middle of treatment, new challenges to femininity arise, and I find myself again attracted to the dress but this time as a potent symbol in my work.

In the “Paper, Scissors, Frock” series I have used the dress as a frame, and in a sense a vessel, in which to contain images of growth, death, life, surrender, and healing, and the internal musings of this particular path on which I find myself. With that playful youthfulness involved in the collecting of those old dresses, that same free spirit is in the making of the papercuts. But a little older and a little wiser. The papercuts play with shadow and spirit. They are crafted around a kitchen table, the centre and heart of the home and family. They are works that deeply resonate with my place in life right now and the knowledge that the feminine will continue to change and evolve over the course of a lifetime.

Sue Codee, 2010

— 3 years ago with 4 notes
#papercut  #art  #feminity  #breast cancer  #fashion  #the body  #eros/thanatos 
Pam Kleemann ::: Photographer / Conceptual Artist, Melbourne Australia

Breast Plates
Breast Plates evolved out of Kleemann’s personal experience with Breast Cancer in 2005, and her interest in the military language used to describe the many forms of cancer.
"A breastplate is a piece of armour that covers the chest or breast area, for protection during battle. Like the post-surgery bras I wore. Cancer is spoken of as a battle, won or lost. A body battle. There’s a war going on. A malignant invasion. A malevolent infiltration. The battle lines are drawn, the trenches dug, the evil rooted out with surgical precision. Shock and awe. I, and the landscape of my breast, have been forever changed."
Prominent Yale surgeon and medical historian Sherwin B Nuland, MD acknowledges that of all the diseases surgeons treat, cancer is the one that they have specifically named ‘The Enemy’ and the central structure of the cancer cell is known as ‘the evil-eye nucleus’. He refers to breast cancer as the evil invader of women’s bodies and visualises cancer cells as “behaving like the members of a barbarian horde run amok – leaderless and undirected, but with a single-minded purpose: to plunder everything within reach.”1 His language is considered ‘apocalyptic’ by author Sally Cline.2
Kleemann has dedicated this work to the memory of three maverick women - British Photographers Jo Spence and Helen Chadwick, and American Writer Audre Lorde, ‘one-breasted proud black activist’.

Getting a brain tumour made me profoundly aware of, and grateful for, how atypical my experiences learing a queer model of health rights in the early HIV/AIDS era was.
Atypical in that a community, health professionals, and suffers of a taboo condition came together to demand - aggressively and erotically - that health care center people in their communities. The hostilities around that disease, which were considerable and continue today, were directed outwards - against anyone who denied our humanity and worth in treatment - rather than inwards, onto patients to render their bodies subject to a territorial pissing match between both the disease and the politics of medial heirarchy and funding.
Belatedly, I’m so grateful to you guys.

Pam Kleemann ::: Photographer / Conceptual Artist, Melbourne Australia

Breast Plates

Breast Plates evolved out of Kleemann’s personal experience with Breast Cancer in 2005, and her interest in the military language used to describe the many forms of cancer.

"A breastplate is a piece of armour that covers the chest or breast area, for protection during battle. Like the post-surgery bras I wore. Cancer is spoken of as a battle, won or lost. A body battle. There’s a war going on. A malignant invasion. A malevolent infiltration. The battle lines are drawn, the trenches dug, the evil rooted out with surgical precision. Shock and awe. I, and the landscape of my breast, have been forever changed."

Prominent Yale surgeon and medical historian Sherwin B Nuland, MD acknowledges that of all the diseases surgeons treat, cancer is the one that they have specifically named ‘The Enemy’ and the central structure of the cancer cell is known as ‘the evil-eye nucleus’. He refers to breast cancer as the evil invader of women’s bodies and visualises cancer cells as “behaving like the members of a barbarian horde run amok – leaderless and undirected, but with a single-minded purpose: to plunder everything within reach.”1 His language is considered ‘apocalyptic’ by author Sally Cline.2

Kleemann has dedicated this work to the memory of three maverick women - British Photographers Jo Spence and Helen Chadwick, and American Writer Audre Lorde, ‘one-breasted proud black activist’.

Getting a brain tumour made me profoundly aware of, and grateful for, how atypical my experiences learing a queer model of health rights in the early HIV/AIDS era was.

Atypical in that a community, health professionals, and suffers of a taboo condition came together to demand - aggressively and erotically - that health care center people in their communities. The hostilities around that disease, which were considerable and continue today, were directed outwards - against anyone who denied our humanity and worth in treatment - rather than inwards, onto patients to render their bodies subject to a territorial pissing match between both the disease and the politics of medial heirarchy and funding.

Belatedly, I’m so grateful to you guys.

— 4 years ago
#art  #feminism  #feminist art  #breast cancer  #Pam Kleeman  #the body