Showing posts tagged beauty myth.
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kusama pyjamas

gender + art If blogs were mullets, this would be the party at the back where I aggregate anything to do with gender in arts and popular culture. mainly queer & feminist art, a smidge of personal favorite artists, the occasional related docos and news. For the business at the front of sharing art that might interest queer, feminist, womanist, genderqueer, transgender, whoever creatives: please click on the pink above.

Titled for Yayoi Kusama, who is the cat's pyjamas.


(via Border Crossings Magazine | Issue 105)

BORDER CROSSINGS: What emerges in your work is that  collage is a natural way of recognizing how you view the world. If the  world is a broken place, then is collage a way of demonstrating that  brokenness or a way of putting it together again?
WANGECHI MUTU: It’s both. Because in the end, the image  has a beauty to it. It’s not something I’m afraid to address and I’m  not trying to dissuade conversation. I’m optimistic and I believe we  grow and will learn to heal. I guess I’m in this in-between situation,  culturally, economically and socially, where I’m not ignorant about how  these things relate to one another and the bridges between them.
I love  collage because I studied sculpture and I’m fascinated by material. The  kinds of things I choose in the collage have a very particular resonance  for me. So if I pick up a National Geographic or Motorbike magazine, it’s about what it stands for and who reads it and why. What  is its purpose and how are women’s bodies used in there?As a woman of  colour, how I’m represented in these publications is of absolute  relevance and importance to me because it tells me where I stand in that  particular culture. So, in that way, collage tells us not just what  cultures have produced but what they’ve fostered.

(via Border Crossings Magazine | Issue 105)

BORDER CROSSINGS: What emerges in your work is that collage is a natural way of recognizing how you view the world. If the world is a broken place, then is collage a way of demonstrating that brokenness or a way of putting it together again?

WANGECHI MUTU: It’s both. Because in the end, the image has a beauty to it. It’s not something I’m afraid to address and I’m not trying to dissuade conversation. I’m optimistic and I believe we grow and will learn to heal. I guess I’m in this in-between situation, culturally, economically and socially, where I’m not ignorant about how these things relate to one another and the bridges between them.

I love collage because I studied sculpture and I’m fascinated by material. The kinds of things I choose in the collage have a very particular resonance for me. So if I pick up a National Geographic or Motorbike magazine, it’s about what it stands for and who reads it and why. What is its purpose and how are women’s bodies used in there?As a woman of colour, how I’m represented in these publications is of absolute relevance and importance to me because it tells me where I stand in that particular culture. So, in that way, collage tells us not just what cultures have produced but what they’ve fostered.

— 2 years ago with 4 notes
#collage  #fostering culture  #WOC  #art  #Wangechi Mutu  #artist interview  #the body  #beauty myth 
Q&A with Wangechi Mutu →

Q Your art is beautiful, but can also be difficult to look at. Why is it important for you to conjure both?

A I think the fact that we can’t agree on what is beautiful and ugly is one of the things my work is founded upon. I don’t go out of my way to do either one or the other, and I don’t see massive divisions between them. It is hard when I ask people what they find beautiful and disturbing in my work, because I don’t always agree. I’m like, “You don’t find this beautiful? It’s beautiful to me.” But the discussion of what is beautiful and what is ugly is really deep and visceral. It’s also a point of contention, because we often have beauty standards that only work in one direction.
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— 2 years ago with 1 note
#art  #Wangechi Mutu  #beauty myth  #collage  #artist interview  #women artists