Showing posts tagged WOC.
x

kusama pyjamas

Submit   gender + art If blogs were mullets, this would be the party at the back where I aggregate anything to do with gender in arts and popular culture. mainly queer & feminist art, a smidge of personal favorite artists, the occasional related docos and news. For the business at the front of sharing art that might interest queer, feminist, womanist, genderqueer, transgender, whoever creatives: please click on the pink above.

Titled for Yayoi Kusama, who is the cat's pyjamas.


What Are You Doing Here? is the first book published on black women involved in the metal, hardcore and punk scenes…and oh, have there been questions! Here are some FAQ’s: 

Q. Why did you write the book about Metal? And black women… Huh?
A. I’m a lifer in the metal scene, and I had a lot of experiences going to shows, purchasing albums (during the days where you had to physically go to a store), and meeting other metal fans, I wanted to meet other black women in the scene. Since the community is predominately white and male, I always wondered if other black women fans shared the same experiences, both good and not so good.
Q. The only black rocker I know is Jimi Hendrix. Are there any black women metal musicians?
A. Yes there are! Some, like MilitiA Vox (Solo artist, Judas Priestess, Swear on Your Life), Alexis Brown (Straight Line Stitch), Diamond Rowe (Tetrarch) and Kudisan Kai are interviewed in the book. Since that time I’ve actually found a couple of other women, such as Audrey Ebrotié from Diary of Destruction and Madame Beatrice from Dust Angel. There are not too many, but there are quite a lot of women also involved in the hardcore and punk scenes, too. There are a few reasons why they are not as visible as they could be, and talent is not one of them!

For more information on the WAYDH Book Event Tour, please visit our Indiegogo Campaign Page. (via  WAYDH Book/ Concert Tour)

What Are You Doing Here? is the first book published on black women involved in the metal, hardcore and punk scenes…and oh, have there been questions! Here are some FAQ’s:

Q. Why did you write the book about Metal? And black women… Huh?

A. I’m a lifer in the metal scene, and I had a lot of experiences going to shows, purchasing albums (during the days where you had to physically go to a store), and meeting other metal fans, I wanted to meet other black women in the scene. Since the community is predominately white and male, I always wondered if other black women fans shared the same experiences, both good and not so good.

Q. The only black rocker I know is Jimi Hendrix. Are there any black women metal musicians?

A. Yes there are! Some, like MilitiA Vox (Solo artist, Judas Priestess, Swear on Your Life), Alexis Brown (Straight Line Stitch), Diamond Rowe (Tetrarch) and Kudisan Kai are interviewed in the book. Since that time I’ve actually found a couple of other women, such as Audrey Ebrotié from Diary of Destruction and Madame Beatrice from Dust Angel. There are not too many, but there are quite a lot of women also involved in the hardcore and punk scenes, too. There are a few reasons why they are not as visible as they could be, and talent is not one of them!

For more information on the WAYDH Book Event Tour, please visit our Indiegogo Campaign Page. (via WAYDH Book/ Concert Tour)

— 6 months ago with 204 notes
#WOC  #metal  #punk  #fundraiser  #black women in punk  #art  #WOC artists  #musicians  #art books  #militia vox  #alexis brown  #diamond rowe  #kudisan kair  #audrey ebrotie  #madame beatrice  #hardcore  #what are you doing here?  #black women 
rachelhills:


I met Luann Algoso last year when I was travelling through Portland doing interviews for The Sex Myth. We drank tea at Starbucks, went for a wander, ended up sitting on the edge of a street fair bantering about hook-up culture, feminism, and, er, Hanson.
Now Luann is producing Dis/orient/ed, the first all Asian American female standup comedy show in Portland, travelling up the West Coast from LA. As well as showcasing an alternative to the ubiquitous white, male comedian, the event is also a fundraiser for two non-profit organisations, one focused on reproductive justice work (Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon) and the other supporting women who have experienced domestic violence (South Asian Women’s Empowerment and Resource Alliance). 
The show is on Saturday, and if you want to check it out, you can buy tickets here. And if you can’t make it and think it looks cool, reblog away!

rachelhills:

I met Luann Algoso last year when I was travelling through Portland doing interviews for The Sex Myth. We drank tea at Starbucks, went for a wander, ended up sitting on the edge of a street fair bantering about hook-up culture, feminism, and, er, Hanson.

Now Luann is producing Dis/orient/ed, the first all Asian American female standup comedy show in Portland, travelling up the West Coast from LA. As well as showcasing an alternative to the ubiquitous white, male comedian, the event is also a fundraiser for two non-profit organisations, one focused on reproductive justice work (Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon) and the other supporting women who have experienced domestic violence (South Asian Women’s Empowerment and Resource Alliance).

The show is on Saturday, and if you want to check it out, you can buy tickets here. And if you can’t make it and think it looks cool, reblog away!

— 6 months ago with 16 notes
#comedy  #woc  #asian american  #portland  #stand up 

Black Salt Collective is the work of artists Grace Rosario Perkins, Adee Roberson, Sarah Sass Biscarra-Dilley, Anna Luisa Petrisko (Jeepneys), and Fanciulla Gentile.
BLACK SALT BEAUTIES We are five women of color artists, musicians, healers, educators, and visionaries. We are Bolivian, Filipino, Chumash, Navajo, Yaqui, Jamaican, Slovak, Swedish, Mexican, African, Basque and Pima. We each make work that is unique, yet share profound commonalities. While rooted in our past, we create the future.
WHAT WE ARE DOING We feel our experiences have been largely undocumented which is why for our first large-scale project we have decided to make a collaborative film. Inspired by works such as Downtown 81, Born in Flames, and Space is the Place, our film will be part-documentary, part-narrative; a spiritual journey through the many worlds that we will create together. via BLACK SALT : THE INITIATION 

Black Salt Collective on tumblr here. Image by Grace Perkins. [Main link = old indigogo link cos it has their Initiation vid which = go see]

Black Salt Collective is the work of artists Grace Rosario Perkins, Adee Roberson, Sarah Sass Biscarra-Dilley, Anna Luisa Petrisko (Jeepneys), and Fanciulla Gentile.

BLACK SALT BEAUTIES We are five women of color artists, musicians, healers, educators, and visionaries. We are Bolivian, Filipino, Chumash, Navajo, Yaqui, Jamaican, Slovak, Swedish, Mexican, African, Basque and Pima. We each make work that is unique, yet share profound commonalities. While rooted in our past, we create the future.

WHAT WE ARE DOING We feel our experiences have been largely undocumented which is why for our first large-scale project we have decided to make a collaborative film. Inspired by works such as Downtown 81, Born in Flames, and Space is the Place, our film will be part-documentary, part-narrative; a spiritual journey through the many worlds that we will create together. via BLACK SALT : THE INITIATION

Black Salt Collective on tumblr here. Image by Grace Perkins. [Main link = old indigogo link cos it has their Initiation vid which = go see]

— 7 months ago with 38 notes
#blacksaltcollective  #QPOC  #WOC  #queer art  #artist collectives  #ritual and performance  #documentary  #artists journeys  #grace rosario 

lordbyronsbloomers:

Women’s History Month: March 3, Warsan Shire

Warsan Shire is a London-based, Kenyan-born, Somali writer whose powerful poetry has left me blown away each time I read it. In her book of poetry “Teaching My Mother How to Give Birth” Shire explores the relationship of women’s bodies to war and displacement. 

Some of my favorite poems by Shire are “I’m Not Sad” and “For Women Who Are Difficult to Love.”

Check out this interview if you’d like to learn more. If you’re a writer or  poet or someone who just enjoys being knocked off your feet by words, read all the poetry!

“If our secrets are secrets because we are told to be ashamed, then we must share them.”

(via nuestrahermana)

— 8 months ago with 7124 notes
#poetry  #artist profile  #warsan shire  #WOC  #artist interview 
crankyskirt:


ISBN 978-1-935950-05-9 Softcover 6″ x 9″, 240pp Coming September 2012
What Are You Doing Here? investigates how black women musicians and fans navigate the metal, hardcore, and punk music genres that are regularly thought of as inclusive spaces and centered on a community spirit, but fail to block out the race and gender issues that exist in the outside world.
“We can neither reflectively choose our color identity nor downplay its social significance simply by willing it to be unimportant… but our color no more binds us to send a predetermined group message to our fellow human beings than our language binds us to convey predetermined thoughts.”—Amy Gutmann
“Sometimes I think nothing is simple but the feeling of pain.”—Lester Bangs
I’ll be the first to admit that, like any other book, What Are You Doing Here? is partly self-serving. I wanted to find other black women like me: metal, hardcore, and punk fans and musicians that were rabid about the music and culture and adamant about asserting their rightful place as black women within those scenes. I wanted to find other women who put aside the cultural baggage that dictates that we must listen to certain musical styles, and simply enjoy the music that influenced us, not just as black women, but as individuals who grew up in an era when, thanks to technology, a large variety of music is accessible and available to everyone. I found many black women and have shared their stories, but I also realize there is still a lot of work to be done.

Sweet! Looking forward to reading this.

crankyskirt:

ISBN 978-1-935950-05-9
Softcover 6″ x 9″, 240pp
Coming September 2012

What Are You Doing Here? investigates how black women musicians and fans navigate the metal, hardcore, and punk music genres that are regularly thought of as inclusive spaces and centered on a community spirit, but fail to block out the race and gender issues that exist in the outside world.

“We can neither reflectively choose our color identity nor downplay its social significance simply by willing it to be unimportant… but our color no more binds us to send a predetermined group message to our fellow human beings than our language binds us to convey predetermined thoughts.”—Amy Gutmann

“Sometimes I think nothing is simple but the feeling of pain.”—Lester Bangs

I’ll be the first to admit that, like any other book, What Are You Doing Here? is partly self-serving. I wanted to find other black women like me: metal, hardcore, and punk fans and musicians that were rabid about the music and culture and adamant about asserting their rightful place as black women within those scenes. I wanted to find other women who put aside the cultural baggage that dictates that we must listen to certain musical styles, and simply enjoy the music that influenced us, not just as black women, but as individuals who grew up in an era when, thanks to technology, a large variety of music is accessible and available to everyone. I found many black women and have shared their stories, but I also realize there is still a lot of work to be done.

Sweet! Looking forward to reading this.

(via blackandbutch)

— 1 year ago with 2334 notes
#music  #subcultures  #WOC  #metal  #punk  #cultural archive  #gender  #race 

curate:

Zanele has started an Indiegogo campaign to raise funds to replace her equipment – PLEASE watch the video and donate what you can

I”ve lost all the work I produced from 2008 – 2012. Also backups were stolen.
I thought of the day I spoke with another friend about alternative storage. Now it is too late.
I feel like a breathing zombie right now.
I don’t even know where to start. I’m wasted.
I’ve sent out a note to friends to tell them about the incident.

The person/s got access to the flat via the toilet window, broke the burglar guard and got away with my cameras, lenses, memory cards and external hard drives, laptop, cellphones…
Whoever ransacked the place got away with more than 20 external hard drives with the most valuable content I’ve ever produced

I am hoping that a few of my good friends are willing to go to pawn shops or to other places where this type of equipment is sold. I do not even want to know who the thief is.

Campaign to replace Zanele Muholi’s stolen photography equipment

On the 28th April, Zanele returned home from Seoul, South Korea to discover that all her work between 2008 and 2012 stored on 20 hard drives and including backups had been stolen on the 20th. The thieves also stole her cameras, lens, memory sticks and laptops. There are no words to describe Zanele’s feelings at this time as an entire original archive of Black queer lesbian history has been destroyed and that impacts on all of us – makes invisible what Zanele has worked so hard to make visible and speak of through her photography. via blacklooks

(via derica)

— 1 year ago with 20 notes
#signal boost  #art  #lesbian  #queer  #LGBTI  #QPOC  #photography  #queer archive  #Afrcian artists  #WOC 
(via absolutearts.com)
Renée Cox, The Discreet Charm of the Bougies - Missy At Home (detail), 2008.

(via absolutearts.com)

Renée Cox, The Discreet Charm of the Bougies - Missy At Home (detail), 2008.

— 2 years ago with 3 notes
#renee cox  #art  #bougies  #portraiture  #photography  #WOC 
possibilitiesof:

Hottentot Venus 2000
Lyle Ashton Harris & Renee Valerie Cox 1995

comment by Cox; "This reclaiming of the image of the Hottentot Venus is a way of exploring my own psychic identification with the image at the level of spectacle. I am playing with what it means to be an African diasporic artist  producing and selling work in a culture that is by and large narcissistically mired in the debasement and objectification of blackness.  And yet, I see my work less as a didactic critique and more as an interrogation of the ambivalence around the body." [source]

possibilitiesof:

Hottentot Venus 2000

Lyle Ashton Harris & Renee Valerie Cox 1995

comment by Cox;

"This reclaiming of the image of the Hottentot Venus is a way of exploring my own psychic identification with the image at the level of spectacle. I am playing with what it means to be an African diasporic artist  producing and selling work in a culture that is by and large narcissistically mired in the debasement and objectification of blackness.  And yet, I see my work less as a didactic critique and more as an interrogation of the ambivalence around the body." [source]

— 2 years ago with 7 notes
#WOC  #art  #imperialism  #photography  #the gaze  #renee cox  #embodiment 
vintageblackglamour:

gray37:

Courtney Gillette (via The real lives of celesbians | AfterEllen.com)
 
Way before Janelle Monae made cute suits her signature, or Lady Gaga was flaunting her alter ego Jo Calderone, there was Gladys Bentley, flirting and singing the blues in men’s clothing during the heyday of the Harlem Renaissance.
Why no one has paid Betley homage with a proper documentary or biography is baffling to me. She wasn’t just into women (gossip columns were all a twitter when Bentley married a white woman in Atlantic City), she was an openly lesbian performer, who sang the blues not only at rent parties and speakeasies but at well known gay establishments. As for her style and preference for suits (and top hats! Homegirl rocks a top hat like nobody’s business!), she later told Ebony magazine, “It seems I was born different. At least, I always thought so….From the time I can remember anything, even as I was toddling, I never wanted a man to touch me…Soon I began to feel more comfortable in boys clothes than in dresses.”
The sad ending, though, came when Betley caved to the conservative pressures of the McCarthy era and “reformed,” marrying a dude, donning dresses, and saying she’d been cured. She also denounced her former ways as an effort to gain a mainstream audience, but that flopped. Gossip, style, blues, speakeasies, love affairs: Gladys Bentley’s life has the makings of some killer nonfiction. Who’s game?

Legendary 1930s blues singer Gladys Bentley. Openly lesbian, Bentley was the headliner at the Clam House, a gay and lesbian club on 133rd street in Harlem where she performed popular songs with double-entendre lyrics in top hat and tuxedo. 

I’ve wondered why she hasn’t received better recognition and queer homage to. Even allowing for the combined erasure of specifically lesbians, butch/bulldagger women and WOC in queer media, Bentley was just such an innovator socially and creatively, through such influential periods in queer history. Her story would appeal to just about any audience that aren’t far right haters.
*though she had accepted conservative public norms by the time of her death, so I dunno about the implications for intellectual property.

vintageblackglamour:

gray37:

Courtney Gillette (via The real lives of celesbians | AfterEllen.com)

Way before Janelle Monae made cute suits her signature, or Lady Gaga was flaunting her alter ego Jo Calderone, there was Gladys Bentley, flirting and singing the blues in men’s clothing during the heyday of the Harlem Renaissance.

Why no one has paid Betley homage with a proper documentary or biography is baffling to me. She wasn’t just into women (gossip columns were all a twitter when Bentley married a white woman in Atlantic City), she was an openly lesbian performer, who sang the blues not only at rent parties and speakeasies but at well known gay establishments. As for her style and preference for suits (and top hats! Homegirl rocks a top hat like nobody’s business!), she later told Ebony magazine, “It seems I was born different. At least, I always thought so….From the time I can remember anything, even as I was toddling, I never wanted a man to touch me…Soon I began to feel more comfortable in boys clothes than in dresses.”

The sad ending, though, came when Betley caved to the conservative pressures of the McCarthy era and “reformed,” marrying a dude, donning dresses, and saying she’d been cured. She also denounced her former ways as an effort to gain a mainstream audience, but that flopped. Gossip, style, blues, speakeasies, love affairs: Gladys Bentley’s life has the makings of some killer nonfiction. Who’s game?

Legendary 1930s blues singer Gladys Bentley. Openly lesbian, Bentley was the headliner at the Clam House, a gay and lesbian club on 133rd street in Harlem where she performed popular songs with double-entendre lyrics in top hat and tuxedo. 

I’ve wondered why she hasn’t received better recognition and queer homage to. Even allowing for the combined erasure of specifically lesbians, butch/bulldagger women and WOC in queer media, Bentley was just such an innovator socially and creatively, through such influential periods in queer history. Her story would appeal to just about any audience that aren’t far right haters.

*though she had accepted conservative public norms by the time of her death, so I dunno about the implications for intellectual property.

(via heyfatchick)

— 2 years ago with 576 notes
#Harlem Renaissance  #WOC  #killer style  #queer  #gladys bentley  #african american  #LGBTI  #music  #history 
REBLOG:... i saw Pariah. →

heysoapie:

tionam:

Reblogging this from when i had the chance to see Pariah at the New Director/New Films fest at the Lincoln Center earlier this year in March. please support this film if it happens to be playing in your city or a city near you!!!

TAKE ACTION! 

Here’s what YOU can do:

1) BUY movie tickets opening week! Bring your friends & family to watch PARIAH or buy tickets for friends & family in NY, LA or San Francisco as a gift online: http://bit.ly/PARIAHtheaters

2) Share PARIAH on your Facebook wall! We’ll keep you updated with release news including cities and dates for PARIAH near you: http://facebook.com/PARIAHthemovie

3) Change your Facebook profile picture! You can use our PARIAH avatar above, just right click, save and upload.

4) Check-In on GetGlue! Tell others what you’re watching and earn PARIAH stickers: http://bit.ly/PARIAHgetglue

5) Share your PARIAH Fan Photo! When you see a PARIAH poster or postcard, take a picture of yourself and share it with our PARIAH community. You can tweet your pic using #PARIAHmovie, share it on our Facebook wall or e-mail your pic to: connect@pariahthemovie.com

FAN & FOLLOW Team #PARIAHmovie!
 
@NorthstarPics @AdeperoOduye @Pernell @KimWayans @AashaDavis @Shadowflack @NinaDaniels @NekisaCooper @milesmaker

tionam:

I had the chance to see Pariah last Saturday for the New Director/New Films fest at the Lincoln Center. I had the chance to see the short film a few years ago and actually sit on a panel that funded the film over the years. So it was such a pleasure to be able to finally see the feature length version of the film.

THE BAR HAS BEEN RAISED.

In regards to Black independent filmmaking this film may have the chance to go down in history as one of the few features that actually stayed true to a high quality of writing and production value. It is a LOVELY film. A strong story that many can relate to. Not just Black lesbians. The characters that Dee Reese wrote are deeply complex and her direction gave the film such a tight and natural feel that is hard to come by these days. Kim Wayans has her first dramatic role in this film and she is absolutely amazing-i was shocked at how good she was! The cast in general contains many unknown but truly talented actors and actresses that will be sure to have a bright future i hope!

such a job well done! Please catch a screening if you can on the fest circuit. The filmmakers spoke of a late fall release, but in the meantime please spread the word! This film is SUCH a good look for Black cinema and has the chance to really reach an audience that may not even know of its existence. So we as a community must do our part and help get the word out!

www.pariahthefilm.com

and PLEASE don’t forget to support the independent queer artists of color that appear on the soundtrack by buying the Pariah album (available on iTunes!!)

reblog for the distro point even though some of the USA premiere screenings are past [but not all!]

this is a premiere theatre screening round. Coverage and turn out at this stage impacts on DVD sales and whether it’s included in all the regional and  international film fests next summer.  Bit of a distro domino effect. So you know, if you can see Pariah in a theatre - or include it in your reviews and promos, arts followers - pls. do!

(Source: tionam, via so-treu)

— 2 years ago with 131 notes
#Pariah  #QPOC  #film  #distibution  #new talent  #queer  #LGBTI  #WOC 
(via Border Crossings Magazine | Issue 105)

BORDER CROSSINGS: What emerges in your work is that  collage is a natural way of recognizing how you view the world. If the  world is a broken place, then is collage a way of demonstrating that  brokenness or a way of putting it together again?
WANGECHI MUTU: It’s both. Because in the end, the image  has a beauty to it. It’s not something I’m afraid to address and I’m  not trying to dissuade conversation. I’m optimistic and I believe we  grow and will learn to heal. I guess I’m in this in-between situation,  culturally, economically and socially, where I’m not ignorant about how  these things relate to one another and the bridges between them.
I love  collage because I studied sculpture and I’m fascinated by material. The  kinds of things I choose in the collage have a very particular resonance  for me. So if I pick up a National Geographic or Motorbike magazine, it’s about what it stands for and who reads it and why. What  is its purpose and how are women’s bodies used in there?As a woman of  colour, how I’m represented in these publications is of absolute  relevance and importance to me because it tells me where I stand in that  particular culture. So, in that way, collage tells us not just what  cultures have produced but what they’ve fostered.

(via Border Crossings Magazine | Issue 105)

BORDER CROSSINGS: What emerges in your work is that collage is a natural way of recognizing how you view the world. If the world is a broken place, then is collage a way of demonstrating that brokenness or a way of putting it together again?

WANGECHI MUTU: It’s both. Because in the end, the image has a beauty to it. It’s not something I’m afraid to address and I’m not trying to dissuade conversation. I’m optimistic and I believe we grow and will learn to heal. I guess I’m in this in-between situation, culturally, economically and socially, where I’m not ignorant about how these things relate to one another and the bridges between them.

I love collage because I studied sculpture and I’m fascinated by material. The kinds of things I choose in the collage have a very particular resonance for me. So if I pick up a National Geographic or Motorbike magazine, it’s about what it stands for and who reads it and why. What is its purpose and how are women’s bodies used in there?As a woman of colour, how I’m represented in these publications is of absolute relevance and importance to me because it tells me where I stand in that particular culture. So, in that way, collage tells us not just what cultures have produced but what they’ve fostered.

— 2 years ago with 4 notes
#collage  #fostering culture  #WOC  #art  #Wangechi Mutu  #artist interview  #the body  #beauty myth 

The poems in Nikky Finney’s breathtaking new collection Head Off & Split sustain a sensitive and intense dialogue with emblematic figures and events in African American life: from civil rights matriarch Rosa Parks to former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice, from a brazen girl strung out on lightning to a terrified woman abandoned on a rooftop during Hurricane Katrina.
Finney’s poetic voice is defined by an intimacy that holds a soft yet exacting eye on the erotic, on uncanny political and family events, like her mother’s wedding waltz with South Carolina senator Strom Thurmond, and then again on the heartbreaking hilarity of an American president’s final State of the Union address. Artful and intense, Finney’s poems ask us to be mindful of what we fraction, fragment, cut off, dice, dishonor, or throw away, powerfully evoking both the lawless and the sublime.

via Write With Your Spine: A Poet Sings: Nikky Finney’s Head Off & Split

The poems in Nikky Finney’s breathtaking new collection Head Off & Split sustain a sensitive and intense dialogue with emblematic figures and events in African American life: from civil rights matriarch Rosa Parks to former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice, from a brazen girl strung out on lightning to a terrified woman abandoned on a rooftop during Hurricane Katrina.

Finney’s poetic voice is defined by an intimacy that holds a soft yet exacting eye on the erotic, on uncanny political and family events, like her mother’s wedding waltz with South Carolina senator Strom Thurmond, and then again on the heartbreaking hilarity of an American president’s final State of the Union address. Artful and intense, Finney’s poems ask us to be mindful of what we fraction, fragment, cut off, dice, dishonor, or throw away, powerfully evoking both the lawless and the sublime.

via Write With Your Spine: A Poet Sings: Nikky Finney’s Head Off & Split

— 2 years ago with 2 notes
#poetry  #the South  #african american  #women  #books  #WOC  #matriarchs  #Nikky Finney 

definition: Aya de Leon looks at the process of Bay area spoken word artist Aya de Leon, whose work is at all times political and certainly fresh. Whether dissecting images of women in hip hop, or exposing the constructs of gender and beauty, Aya de Leon makes you think, makes you laugh, makes you cry, makes you listen. To learn more about the phenom’s work, check out the docu-bio, which explores the writer/poet/activist’s artistic process, and the lives she touches as she moves through the world.

* definition: Aya de Leon is Directed by Jennifer Ongiri Produced by Marla Renee Leech and Shalonda Ingram. via Purchase definition: Aya de Leon | Nursha Project

— 2 years ago with 4 notes
#body image  #documentary  #spoken word  #Aya de Leon  #hip hop  #writing  #WOC