Showing posts tagged LGBT.
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kusama pyjamas

gender + art If blogs were mullets, this would be the party at the back where I aggregate anything to do with gender in arts and popular culture. mainly queer & feminist art, a smidge of personal favorite artists, the occasional related docos and news. For the business at the front of sharing art that might interest queer, feminist, womanist, genderqueer, transgender, whoever creatives: please click on the pink above.

Titled for Yayoi Kusama, who is the cat's pyjamas.


bklynboihood:

Kortnery Ryan Ziegler’s debut documentary, still black, centers on the narratives of six black transmen about their identities and their lives. They discuss themes as expected and varied as: transitioning, employment, marriage, parenting, poetry, ability, sexuality, gendered space, and social movements. The group of participants is also extremely diverse, vary by age, education, faith, and location. This serves to remind us of the diversity within the black transcommunity as much as within the larger black and queer ones.
Check out the longer review here.

bklynboihood:

Kortnery Ryan Ziegler’s debut documentary, still black, centers on the narratives of six black transmen about their identities and their lives. They discuss themes as expected and varied as: transitioning, employment, marriage, parenting, poetry, ability, sexuality, gendered space, and social movements. The group of participants is also extremely diverse, vary by age, education, faith, and location. This serves to remind us of the diversity within the black transcommunity as much as within the larger black and queer ones.

Check out the longer review here.

— 10 months ago with 88 notes
#still black  #documentary  #transmen  #queer art  #QPOC  #lgbt  #trans*  #kortney ryan ziegler 
"GrenAIDS is an artist/activist collective whose efforts are to put an end to the stigmatization of persons living with HIV/AIDS by producing aggressive work that awakens people to the reality that the AIDS crisis is not over."
The images above are their first public works, which debuted at Life Chances: HIV Criminalization and Trans Politics event on April 24th at Leslie Lohman Art Museum. With text that reads, ” HIV is not a crime” the images are aimed at getting people to start talking about HIV Criminalization and how that related to already marginalized bodies. Stigma resulting from criminalization only fuels the epidemic.
(via GrenAIDS, a new art collective, has something to say — Visual AIDS)

"GrenAIDS is an artist/activist collective whose efforts are to put an end to the stigmatization of persons living with HIV/AIDS by producing aggressive work that awakens people to the reality that the AIDS crisis is not over."

The images above are their first public works, which debuted at Life Chances: HIV Criminalization and Trans Politics event on April 24th at Leslie Lohman Art Museum. With text that reads, ” HIV is not a crime” the images are aimed at getting people to start talking about HIV Criminalization and how that related to already marginalized bodies. Stigma resulting from criminalization only fuels the epidemic.

(via GrenAIDS, a new art collective, has something to say — Visual AIDS)

— 10 months ago with 19 notes
#HIV/AIDS  #queer art  #AIDS art  #political art  #art  #QPOC  #prison industrial complex  #lgbt  #photography 
(via Manila Contemporary)

Queer Manila attempts to create a visual discussion around gender and sexuality within local contexts and internationalised LGBT discourse. It explores the understandings, misunderstandings, conflicts, humours, loves, eroticisms, deviances, spectacles, and dilemmas within Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual and Transgender identities.

Exhibition past but works still up at gallery site.

(via Manila Contemporary)

Queer Manila attempts to create a visual discussion around gender and sexuality within local contexts and internationalised LGBT discourse. It explores the understandings, misunderstandings, conflicts, humours, loves, eroticisms, deviances, spectacles, and dilemmas within Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual and Transgender identities.

Exhibition past but works still up at gallery site.

— 1 year ago with 51 notes
#photography  #manila  #LGBT  #queer art  #art 
glbtq » Special Features » Tina Fiveash: A Retrospective
Peter I, 1999. From Tina Fiveash’s series documenting her friend Peters transition. 

glbtq » Special Features » Tina Fiveash: A Retrospective

Peter I, 1999. From Tina Fiveash’s series documenting her friend Peters transition. 

— 3 years ago with 89 notes
#Tina Fiveash  #gender  #transgender  #portraits  #queer art  #art  #photography  #LGBT 

Dear Friends, For many years - since I came out as being lesbian/queer - I have been thinking about the visual representation of ‘queer women’ in popular culture, visual art, media and the public realm. Often, I have toyed with the idea of making images that reflect the intimate and daily experience of women who love women.
Living in India, this has often been a difficult proposition since it is extremely problematic for women to be OUT (visually) for varying reasons of safety that could lead to loosing jobs, apartments and fracture further the relationship with our families, friends and general social interaction and mobility. This is true for queer women in many parts of the world.
Therefore, while many of us make self-portraits, have intimate photos of ourselves or our partners and friends, daily life record etc, these are mostly restricted to the privacy of our homes and shared with a handful of people. How then to represent a wide range of images of queer women from different parts of the world? Images that reflect ourselves, our lovers, partners, familiars, alternative families etc. while being able to reflect gender, sexuality, race, culture, ability and age?
One possible answer came to me as I was looking through the holiday photos of friends, pictures they had taken of themselves (auto-portraits) on the beach at dawn. Suddenly I felt so delighted to simply see images of a dyke couple on holiday! That kicked started – Queer women take a holiday! Pictures taken by us for ourselves - record, and documentation of our lives - the way we choose to make it.
So please, I request you to send me at least one holiday photo of yourself - either alone, with your former/current lover/s, partner/s, familiars (human or non-human), and friends or family (with their permission of course). I propose to compile the images I receive from you into a book (no publishers as yet, but I am looking) and possibly into a web archive. via :::Project:::queerwomentakeaholiday:::

What a great concept re: snapshots as a ‘conspicuous by abscence’ queer signifier! The project is by Tejal Shah, a multi-disciplinary artist from India and Melbourne. As far as can tell it’s ongoing, click for details.

Dear Friends, For many years - since I came out as being lesbian/queer - I have been thinking about the visual representation of ‘queer women’ in popular culture, visual art, media and the public realm. Often, I have toyed with the idea of making images that reflect the intimate and daily experience of women who love women.

Living in India, this has often been a difficult proposition since it is extremely problematic for women to be OUT (visually) for varying reasons of safety that could lead to loosing jobs, apartments and fracture further the relationship with our families, friends and general social interaction and mobility. This is true for queer women in many parts of the world.

Therefore, while many of us make self-portraits, have intimate photos of ourselves or our partners and friends, daily life record etc, these are mostly restricted to the privacy of our homes and shared with a handful of people. How then to represent a wide range of images of queer women from different parts of the world? Images that reflect ourselves, our lovers, partners, familiars, alternative families etc. while being able to reflect gender, sexuality, race, culture, ability and age?

One possible answer came to me as I was looking through the holiday photos of friends, pictures they had taken of themselves (auto-portraits) on the beach at dawn. Suddenly I felt so delighted to simply see images of a dyke couple on holiday! That kicked started – Queer women take a holiday! Pictures taken by us for ourselves - record, and documentation of our lives - the way we choose to make it.

So please, I request you to send me at least one holiday photo of yourself - either alone, with your former/current lover/s, partner/s, familiars (human or non-human), and friends or family (with their permission of course). I propose to compile the images I receive from you into a book (no publishers as yet, but I am looking) and possibly into a web archive. via :::Project:::queerwomentakeaholiday:::

What a great concept re: snapshots as a ‘conspicuous by abscence’ queer signifier! The project is by Tejal Shah, a multi-disciplinary artist from India and Melbourne. As far as can tell it’s ongoing, click for details.

— 3 years ago with 6 notes
#photos  #visibility  #queer  #lesbian  #LGBT  #India  #self portraits  #dyke on holiday!  #women 

“The assumption that animals are without rights and the illusion that our treatment of them has no moral significance is a positively outrageous example of Western crudity and barbarity. Universal compassion is the only guarantee of morality.” Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860)
I smile a wry smile: a colleague who is looking at some of my images has just asked me “why do you photograph cows?” with a look of slight mockery, his eyes starting to mist over with boredom. It is at least a change from “are those sheep gay?’, although in all fairness to the animals I photograph, evidence of them forming a modern Western sexual identity might be tricky to capture in just one shoot. My current work is provocative, exploring the relationship between people and farmed animals given how little contact most of us have with them. [via Why does a ‘queer’ artist want to photograph cows? « GFEST – Gaywise FESTival : LGBT, Queer]

“The assumption that animals are without rights and the illusion that our treatment of them has no moral significance is a positively outrageous example of Western crudity and barbarity. Universal compassion is the only guarantee of morality.” Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860)

I smile a wry smile: a colleague who is looking at some of my images has just asked me “why do you photograph cows?” with a look of slight mockery, his eyes starting to mist over with boredom. It is at least a change from “are those sheep gay?’, although in all fairness to the animals I photograph, evidence of them forming a modern Western sexual identity might be tricky to capture in just one shoot. My current work is provocative, exploring the relationship between people and farmed animals given how little contact most of us have with them. [via Why does a ‘queer’ artist want to photograph cows? « GFEST – Gaywise FESTival : LGBT, Queer]

— 3 years ago with 1 note
#queer art  #animals  #ethics  #queer  #art  #photography  #LGBT 
Ishita Srivastava - Desigirls →

ardhra:

documentary about queer South Asian women in NYC

What role does the South Asian LGBT community in New York City play in the life of ‘A’, who might never tell her family that she is a lesbian? In contrast, what do Priyanka, who lives with her girlfriend and is able to be open about her sexuality, and Ashu, a DJ who runs Sholay productions, a social events group for queer South Asians, gain from being a part of this community? Desigirls follows ‘A’ and Priyanka as they negotiate their diverse and often fraught experiences as gay Indian women in New York.  While ‘A’ is not comfortable with her sexuality, how is it that Priyanka, brought up in India, is? The documentary explores what their varying experiences tell us about the role of minority community groups in a diverse and often fractured immigrant society.

— 3 years ago with 2 notes
#desigirls  #ishita srivastava  #documentary  #queer  #women  #desi  #Indian  #lesbian  #LGBT  #NYC 
Spotlight on gay writers from across the Caribbean →

bonesarecoralmade:

AUTHOR and activist Thomas Glave in collaboration with the Institute of Gender and Development Studies (IGDS), UWI, St Augustine will host a public lecture and book launch at the Daaga Hall Auditorium at UWI on April 15 at 5.30 pm.

..

Glave is a Professor of Creative Writing, English, and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at SUNY Binghamton. … The first book of its kind, Our Caribbean: A Gathering of Lesbian and Gay Writing from the Antilles Published by Duke University Press, 2008, is an anthology of lesbian and gay writing from across the Antilles.

Glave has gathered outstanding fiction, nonfiction, memoir, and poetry by little-known writers together with selections by internationally celebrated figures such as José Alcántara Almánzar, Reinaldo Arenas, Dionne Brand, Michelle Cliff, Audre Lorde, Achy Obejas, and Assotto Saint. The result is an unprecedented literary conversation on gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered experiences throughout the Caribbean and its far-flung diaspora. Many selections were originally published in Spanish, Dutch, or creole languages; some are translated into English here for the first time.

The 37 authors hail from the Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Panama, Puerto Rico, St Vincent, St Kitts, Suriname and Trinidad. Many have lived outside the Caribbean, and their writings depict histories of voluntary migration as well as exile from the repressive governments, communities, and families. Many pieces have a political urgency that reflect their author’s work as activists, teachers, community organisers, and performers. Desire commingles with ostracism and allegation throughout: in the evocative portrayals of same-sex love and longing, and in the selections addressing religion, family, race, and class.

From the poem “Saturday Night in San Juan with the Right Sailors” to the poignant narrative “We Came All the Way from Cuba So You Could Dress Like This?” to an eloquent call for the embrace of difference that appeared in the Nassau Daily Tribune on the eve of an anti-gay protest, Our Caribbean is a brave and necessary book.

Contributors are José Alcántara Almánzar, Aldo Alvarez, Reinaldo Arenas, Rane Arroyo, Jesús, R Erica Doyle, Thomas Glave, Rosamond S King, Helen Klonaris, Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes, Audre Lorde, Shani Mootoo, Anton Nimblett, Achy Obejas, Leonardo Padura Fuentes, Virgilio Piñera, Patricia Powell, Kevin Everod Quashie, Juanita Ramos, Colin Robinson, Assotto Saint, Andrew Salkey, Lawrence Scott, Maikeda Silvera, H Nigel Thomas, Rinaldo Walcott, Gloria Wekker and Lawson Williams.

— 4 years ago
#writing  #Caribbean  #queer  #gay  #non-fiction  #LGBT  #diaspora  #Thomas Glave  #West Indies  #anthology 
Femmes of Color Symposium 2010 →

Call for Workshops, Papers, Performance, and Art Femme of Color Symposium (FOCS) 2010: Celebrations and Reflections March 26-28, 2009 Astor Crowne Plaza 739 Canal Street New Orleans, Louisiana 70130 www.focs2010.com FOCS2010: Celebrations and Reflections, the inaugural symposium by and for self-identified FEMMES of COLOR, will create the opportunity—through workshops, community building/social activities, presentations, panels, and/or performances—to uncover and discover our similarities, our differences, our needs and how to build the bridges that will allow us to support each other in all ofwho we are. It will serve as a launch point for a real-time and virtual nation-wide network of diverse individuals, prompt dialogue, and empower us to cultivate, sustain, and celebrate the vibrant connections we have made and will make among femmes of color. We invite femmes of color from all over the map—community members, artists, academics, homemakers, activists, etc.—to participate in FOCS2010 as presenters and participants.

This looks awesome! The submissions date’s a week away, Jan 31st but they’re taking all kinds of performance, workshops etc.

— 4 years ago with 1 note
#femmes  #WOC  #symposium  #call out  #activism  #queer  #LGBT  #dykes  #bi  #transfolk  #New Orleans  #art 
Can a film stop homophobic bullying? →

gauntlet:

And now we have it: Stonewall has produced a feature film called Fit that dramatises the issue and a DVD of which will be sent out to every secondary school in Britain next month. The movie is based on the 2007 play of the same name with which Stonewall has toured schools around the UK. School films do not normally rank as must-sees with their low budgets and often clunking approaches to the subject matter. But this is rather different.

In an hour and 45 minutes, more insight into gay youth issues, sexual identity and the nature of bullying is offered than in any other film that has broached these topics. It is episodic; each segment follows a different member of a dance and drama class in a fictitious London school. It’s a kind of gritty take on the shiny E4 drama Glee.

— 4 years ago
#film  #bullying  #homophobia  #queer  #youth  #LGBT 
curate:

bonesarecoralmade:

Beyond the Blue Sky by Brandt Miller
Mongolia’s  		lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community have long been  		misunderstood and rejected in Mongolian society. Ignorance,  		misunderstanding and intolerance have led to widespread prejudice,  		discrimination and violence. Fear of persecution on simply the basis of  		one’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity has forced many members  		of the LGBT community to hide their true selves, thereby becoming an  		invisible presence in a hostile world. However underground the community  		may be, it is nonetheless a vibrant one, full  		of hope, passion, dreams, and a burning desire to one day gain  		acceptance and recognition. They are your friends, your colleagues, your  		brothers and sisters, sons and daughters.  They share the same goals,  		the same loves, the same triumphs, the same heartaches.
This exhibition  		gives visibility to this largely hidden group within our society, to  		allow them to articulate their life struggles through the medium of art.  		It is the first time in this country’s history that such an exhibition  		has been held, and it would not have been possible without the  		collaboration of the local LGBT community, contributions from national  		and international artists, and support from countless individuals  		committed to social change.
The  		artworks exhibited are designed to challenge traditional notions of  		gender and sexuality and to confront the harsh realities of life facing  		the LGBT community. In order to ensure the safety of the photographic  		subjects, and to also represent the hidden nature of LGBT people’s lives  		and their invisibility in society, their faces have been covered with  		blue scarves known as khadags. The use of the khadag, which  		traditionally covers the faces of those who have died, also symbolically  		mirrors the present reality in which many LGBT people feel they are not  		fully living.
via sexgenderbody + thegang

curate:

bonesarecoralmade:

Beyond the Blue Sky by Brandt Miller

Mongolia’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community have long been misunderstood and rejected in Mongolian society. Ignorance, misunderstanding and intolerance have led to widespread prejudice, discrimination and violence. Fear of persecution on simply the basis of one’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity has forced many members of the LGBT community to hide their true selves, thereby becoming an invisible presence in a hostile world. However underground the community may be, it is nonetheless a vibrant one, full of hope, passion, dreams, and a burning desire to one day gain acceptance and recognition. They are your friends, your colleagues, your brothers and sisters, sons and daughters. They share the same goals, the same loves, the same triumphs, the same heartaches.

This exhibition gives visibility to this largely hidden group within our society, to allow them to articulate their life struggles through the medium of art. It is the first time in this country’s history that such an exhibition has been held, and it would not have been possible without the collaboration of the local LGBT community, contributions from national and international artists, and support from countless individuals committed to social change.

The artworks exhibited are designed to challenge traditional notions of gender and sexuality and to confront the harsh realities of life facing the LGBT community. In order to ensure the safety of the photographic subjects, and to also represent the hidden nature of LGBT people’s lives and their invisibility in society, their faces have been covered with blue scarves known as khadags. The use of the khadag, which traditionally covers the faces of those who have died, also symbolically mirrors the present reality in which many LGBT people feel they are not fully living.

via sexgenderbody + thegang

— 4 years ago with 24 notes
#art  #queer  #LGBT  #Mongolia  #eros/thanatos  #Brandt Miller