kusama pyjamas

gender + art If blogs were mullets, this would be the party at the back where I aggregate anything to do with gender in arts and popular culture. mainly queer & feminist art, a smidge of personal favorite artists, the occasional related docos and news. For the business at the front of sharing art that might interest queer, feminist, womanist, genderqueer, transgender, whoever creatives: please click on the pink above.

Titled for Yayoi Kusama, who is the cat's pyjamas.


(via Border Crossings Magazine | Issue 105)

BORDER CROSSINGS: What emerges in your work is that  collage is a natural way of recognizing how you view the world. If the  world is a broken place, then is collage a way of demonstrating that  brokenness or a way of putting it together again?
WANGECHI MUTU: It’s both. Because in the end, the image  has a beauty to it. It’s not something I’m afraid to address and I’m  not trying to dissuade conversation. I’m optimistic and I believe we  grow and will learn to heal. I guess I’m in this in-between situation,  culturally, economically and socially, where I’m not ignorant about how  these things relate to one another and the bridges between them.
I love  collage because I studied sculpture and I’m fascinated by material. The  kinds of things I choose in the collage have a very particular resonance  for me. So if I pick up a National Geographic or Motorbike magazine, it’s about what it stands for and who reads it and why. What  is its purpose and how are women’s bodies used in there?As a woman of  colour, how I’m represented in these publications is of absolute  relevance and importance to me because it tells me where I stand in that  particular culture. So, in that way, collage tells us not just what  cultures have produced but what they’ve fostered.

(via Border Crossings Magazine | Issue 105)

BORDER CROSSINGS: What emerges in your work is that collage is a natural way of recognizing how you view the world. If the world is a broken place, then is collage a way of demonstrating that brokenness or a way of putting it together again?

WANGECHI MUTU: It’s both. Because in the end, the image has a beauty to it. It’s not something I’m afraid to address and I’m not trying to dissuade conversation. I’m optimistic and I believe we grow and will learn to heal. I guess I’m in this in-between situation, culturally, economically and socially, where I’m not ignorant about how these things relate to one another and the bridges between them.

I love collage because I studied sculpture and I’m fascinated by material. The kinds of things I choose in the collage have a very particular resonance for me. So if I pick up a National Geographic or Motorbike magazine, it’s about what it stands for and who reads it and why. What is its purpose and how are women’s bodies used in there?As a woman of colour, how I’m represented in these publications is of absolute relevance and importance to me because it tells me where I stand in that particular culture. So, in that way, collage tells us not just what cultures have produced but what they’ve fostered.

— 2 years ago with 4 notes
#collage  #fostering culture  #WOC  #art  #Wangechi Mutu  #artist interview  #the body  #beauty myth 
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