kusama pyjamas

Submit   gender + art If blogs were mullets, this would be the party at the back where I aggregate anything to do with gender in arts, pop culture and my favorite, queer feminist art. Less a blog than a visual scrapbook/experiment in linking creators and audiences. For the business at the front of sharing art that might interest queer, feminist, womanist, sex radical, genderqueer, transgender, whoever creatives: please click on the pink above.

Titled for Yayoi Kusama, who is the cat's pyjamas.



The brightly coloured quilt Alice Walker made at her mother’s suggestion while she was writing The Color Purple,  and the original handwritten manuscript of her Pulitzer prize-winning  novel, have been put on display at a university in Georgia.
Spanning  a period of 65 years and featuring 200 items, the first public  exhibition of the archives of the Georgia-born Walker also includes the  scrapbook she began to keep aged 14, photographs, letters, memorabilia  and drafts of her early writings. A note written by Walker on a pad of  paper reads: “People are known by the records they keep. If it isn’t in  the records it will be said it didn’t happen. That is what history is: a  keeping of records.”
"I knew that though I might never live in Georgia again, my first 17 years growing up Georgian made a powerful imprint on my spirit and that it was the beauty of the rural community into which I was born that accounts for much of my passion, optimism and faith in the goodness of others. Emory struck me, on visiting it, to have light, a compassionate and thoughtful light, that made even the buildings seem softer and more inviting than those I encountered in other places."
(via Archive exhibition shows ‘history’ of The Color Purple | Books | guardian.co.uk)

The brightly coloured quilt Alice Walker made at her mother’s suggestion while she was writing The Color Purple, and the original handwritten manuscript of her Pulitzer prize-winning novel, have been put on display at a university in Georgia.

Spanning a period of 65 years and featuring 200 items, the first public exhibition of the archives of the Georgia-born Walker also includes the scrapbook she began to keep aged 14, photographs, letters, memorabilia and drafts of her early writings. A note written by Walker on a pad of paper reads: “People are known by the records they keep. If it isn’t in the records it will be said it didn’t happen. That is what history is: a keeping of records.”

"I knew that though I might never live in Georgia again, my first 17 years growing up Georgian made a powerful imprint on my spirit and that it was the beauty of the rural community into which I was born that accounts for much of my passion, optimism and faith in the goodness of others. Emory struck me, on visiting it, to have light, a compassionate and thoughtful light, that made even the buildings seem softer and more inviting than those I encountered in other places."

(via Archive exhibition shows ‘history’ of The Color Purple | Books | guardian.co.uk)

— 2 years ago with 192 notes
#Alice Walker  #womanism  #quilts  #The Color Purple 
  1. casaatabexache reblogged this from kusamapyjamas
  2. justbecalm reblogged this from baldblackbeauties
  3. baldblackbeauties reblogged this from akwsofly
  4. soemily reblogged this from popca and added:
    milkeemountainmama: Reading this - and choking up too - brought to mind Toni Morrison’s explanation of Beloved. That’s...
  5. thebeardedlady reblogged this from dynastylnoire
  6. kimajones reblogged this from note-a-bear
  7. akwsofly reblogged this from mercedesnechelle
  8. checkdasteez reblogged this from dynastylnoire and added:
    (via imgTumble)
  9. afrikadandara reblogged this from dynastylnoire
  10. calebintheaftershed reblogged this from dynastylnoire
  11. mercedesnechelle reblogged this from dynastylnoire
  12. dynastylnoire reblogged this from kweenelibeth
  13. kweenelibeth reblogged this from zoratonimaya
  14. zoratonimaya reblogged this from blackherstory
  15. bookgasms reblogged this from teachingliteracy
  16. aizure reblogged this from silentgirl428
  17. silentgirl428 reblogged this from teachingliteracy