kusama pyjamas

Submit   gender + art If blogs were mullets, this would be the party at the back where I aggregate anything to do with gender in arts and popular culture. mainly queer & feminist art, a smidge of personal favorite artists, the occasional related docos and news. For the business at the front of sharing art that might interest queer, feminist, womanist, genderqueer, transgender, whoever creatives: please click on the pink above.

Titled for Yayoi Kusama, who is the cat's pyjamas.


Lalla Essaydi  Les Femmes du Maroc- Harem Women Writing, 2008 (ArtAsiaPacific: Writing Women Interview With Lalla Essaydi)

Lalla Essaydi  Les Femmes du Maroc- Harem Women Writing, 2008 (ArtAsiaPacific: Writing Women Interview With Lalla Essaydi)

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#art  #calligraphy  #henna  #lalla essaydi  #WOC artists 
Lalla Essaydi. Les Femmes du Maroc #21B, 2006.

In your works, systems of power and domination, such as the male mastery of literature and calligraphy, are imposed on the photographed subjects. What are some of the contradictions and complexities that your work addresses?
I go to great lengths to make the text illegible. I want it to become a language of its own, appreciated in the same way as the figure. It doesn’t necessarily need to have a meaning. The whole work is my story and the story of these women. For me, [calligraphy] is important because it’s the writing style of the Quran, and because it’s a masculine art form I didn’t have access to growing up. Poetry, architecture and calligraphy have always been considered “high-art” in Islamic culture. By writing calligraphy with henna, a medium associated with women’s craft, I put the two together instead of pulling them apart.

(Writing Women Interview With Lalla Essaydi)

Lalla Essaydi. Les Femmes du Maroc #21B, 2006.

In your works, systems of power and domination, such as the male mastery of literature and calligraphy, are imposed on the photographed subjects. What are some of the contradictions and complexities that your work addresses?

I go to great lengths to make the text illegible. I want it to become a language of its own, appreciated in the same way as the figure. It doesn’t necessarily need to have a meaning. The whole work is my story and the story of these women. For me, [calligraphy] is important because it’s the writing style of the Quran, and because it’s a masculine art form I didn’t have access to growing up. Poetry, architecture and calligraphy have always been considered “high-art” in Islamic culture. By writing calligraphy with henna, a medium associated with women’s craft, I put the two together instead of pulling them apart.

(Writing Women Interview With Lalla Essaydi)

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#art  #lalla essaydi  #Artist Interview  #WOC artists  #calligraphy 

Mickalene Thomas and Deirdre Logue in Conversation at the 2013 Reel Artists Film Festival (by Canadian Art)

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Austin Chronicle review of Laurie Frick ‘Quantify-me’ by Wayne Alan Brenner | Jan 27, 2012 |
You can track just about everything you do in your life these days, using the Internet via computer or cell phone apps to generate charts of what you did, with whom, how much, where, when, and everything but why.
“Why?” is the question most often left to artists and philosophers, and the best answer is frequently “Why not?” Laurie Frick, on the other hand – the hand holding the pen and ink and glue and paper and so on – makes art from those very charts and tallies and what tech types like to call metrics. Frick takes her recorded and measured life and transforms it into visual representations made of thousands of laminate counter-top samples, of intricate collage, of thick laser-cut paper hangings that fill the middle interior of Women & Their Work for this one-woman show called “Quantify Me.” It’s a one-woman self-portrait show, specifically, because that’s the artist herself you’re looking at, made evident in visualizations of how much she slept each night, how much food she ate, how many calories burned, how many places visited, what her daily moods have been, and more.
Much of what we are, as R. Buckminster Fuller suggested of himself, is a verb; and here the relentless human verb has been transmogrified into the concrete noun. You’re not just looking at parts of the quantifiable Frick, though, you’re actually walking through the artist’s data-centric incarnation as the cut-paper hangings form a many-layered maze in the midst of the gallery, the lacunae of each chart providing peepholes through which you can view the other charts, the collages, the other visitors, that one main wall completely covered with staggering spectra of laminate samples. (via LAURIE FRICK | press)

Austin Chronicle review of Laurie Frick ‘Quantify-me’ by Wayne Alan Brenner | Jan 27, 2012 |

You can track just about everything you do in your life these days, using the Internet via computer or cell phone apps to generate charts of what you did, with whom, how much, where, when, and everything but why.

“Why?” is the question most often left to artists and philosophers, and the best answer is frequently “Why not?” Laurie Frick, on the other hand – the hand holding the pen and ink and glue and paper and so on – makes art from those very charts and tallies and what tech types like to call metrics. Frick takes her recorded and measured life and transforms it into visual representations made of thousands of laminate counter-top samples, of intricate collage, of thick laser-cut paper hangings that fill the middle interior of Women & Their Work for this one-woman show called “Quantify Me.” It’s a one-woman self-portrait show, specifically, because that’s the artist herself you’re looking at, made evident in visualizations of how much she slept each night, how much food she ate, how many calories burned, how many places visited, what her daily moods have been, and more.

Much of what we are, as R. Buckminster Fuller suggested of himself, is a verb; and here the relentless human verb has been transmogrified into the concrete noun. You’re not just looking at parts of the quantifiable Frick, though, you’re actually walking through the artist’s data-centric incarnation as the cut-paper hangings form a many-layered maze in the midst of the gallery, the lacunae of each chart providing peepholes through which you can view the other charts, the collages, the other visitors, that one main wall completely covered with staggering spectra of laminate samples. (via LAURIE FRICK | press)

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#this is fascinating  #laurie frick  #self surveillance  #art  #reviews  #quantify me 
(via LAURIE FRICK | art…and experiments in self-tracking) “Daily Time Slices” 40 in x 48″, 21 days of daily activities coded by color and duration.

(via LAURIE FRICK | art…and experiments in self-tracking)
“Daily Time Slices” 40 in x 48″, 21 days of daily activities coded by color and duration.

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#laurie frick  #art  #self tracking  #quantifying life  #selfies 

lauriefrick:

Time sleeping is a lot like time during the day, it’s all sliced up into bits. #quantifiedself - 1 is awake, 2 is REM, 4 is deep sleep, and #3 light sleep, aka trash sleep is all folded up. 12” x 12”, watercolor and ink on paper. “Sleeping in Pink”.

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annaconstance:

Adrian Piper
catalysis III, 1970

annaconstance:

Adrian Piper

catalysis III, 1970

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Milind Soman Made Me Gay (by Frameline) Published on Mar 1, 2012

In 1995, the Indian Government charged Bollywood superstar Milind Soman with ‘obscenity’ for appearing nude in a shoe advertisement. Under the rhetoric of preserving nation’s morality, these charges were carried-out using old colonial laws that are still evoked to restrict desire and persecute homosexuality in India today.

Milind Soman Made Me Gay is a conceptual documentary about desire and notions of ‘home’ and ‘belonging’. The film employs a unique mix of visual elements along with voice over narration to juxtapose memories of the filmmaker’s past against stories of three gay South Asian men living in the diaspora. Overshadowing these nostalgic explorations of life ‘back home,’ are harsh realities of homophobia and racism in America and an on-going struggle to find a place of belonging.

Harjant Gill 2007 27min. USA

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#to watch  #documentaries 

Yayoi Kusama in her New York studio, 1960.

Yayoi Kusama in her New York studio, 1960.

(via actuallygrimes)

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lindsaybottos:

get over it, lindsay bottos

thoughts about my assault embroidered onto my mascara-stained pillowcase, 2014

(via riotgrrrlproblems)

— 1 week ago with 23386 notes