kusama pyjamas

gender + art If blogs were mullets, this would be the party at the back where I aggregate anything to do with gender in arts and popular culture. mainly queer & feminist art, a smidge of personal favorite artists, the occasional related docos and news. For the business at the front of sharing art that might interest queer, feminist, womanist, genderqueer, transgender, whoever creatives: please click on the pink above.

Titled for Yayoi Kusama, who is the cat's pyjamas.


Nia King-Interview with Ryka Aoki →

topsidepress:

Did you see this interview with Ryka Aoki? It’s going to be reprinted in Nia King’s new book of interviews with queer and trans artists of color- Stories of Some of Our Lives. It is really smart (like everything Ryka does or says!) and it will repay your time, we promise.

— 2 days ago with 4 notes

niaking:

Just published episode 34 of the podcast, featuring Miyuki Baker!

Miyuki Baker spent fourteen months traveling to sixteen countries and making zines about the queer cultures she encountered in each place. In this interview we discuss how she found the funds to travel, the connotations of “queer” in different countries, and international polyamory. Read here. Download here.

— 3 weeks ago with 34 notes
#artist interviews  #queer arts  #miyuki baker  #nia king  #podcasts  #zines  #qpoc  #queer 
blackcontemporaryart:

VISUALIZING QUEERNESS: 7 CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS Curated by Beck Feibelman and PJ Gubatina Policarpio

The American queer community has made dramatic progress in visibility and in the exercise of social and political power in recent years. But really, it is not so much a singular queer community, but a diverse and complex array of multiple queer communities.
 Art has always been one of the most vital ways in which these communities have communicated to themselves, to each other, and to the outside world. This exhibition brings together work by seven queer artists—including the performance by André Singleton at the opening reception—who seek to represent themselves and their circles with a combination of respect, wit, dignity, defiance, and glamour.
The artwork in this show focuses on specific, individual personalities—both actual portrait subjects and fanciful imagined figures—and do not rely on queer stereotypes or stock characters. They create beautiful and dynamic images of communities either on or just under the surface. All of these artists display the clarity of vision and boldness of expression that are important to the work of making their communities visible and powerful. As they should be.

Photo: King Texas

On view June Dixon Place NYC. June 30 - August 22Featuring work by Ana Benaroya, Zen Browne, Tinker Coalescing, Machine Dazzle, Sara Lautman, André Singleton and King Texas.

blackcontemporaryart:

VISUALIZING QUEERNESS: 7 CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS Curated by Beck Feibelman and PJ Gubatina Policarpio

The American queer community has made dramatic progress in visibility and in the exercise of social and political power in recent years. But really, it is not so much a singular queer community, but a diverse and complex array of multiple queer communities.

 Art has always been one of the most vital ways in which these communities have communicated to themselves, to each other, and to the outside world. This exhibition brings together work by seven queer artists—including the performance by André Singleton at the opening reception—who seek to represent themselves and their circles with a combination of respect, wit, dignity, defiance, and glamour.

The artwork in this show focuses on specific, individual personalities—both actual portrait subjects and fanciful imagined figures—and do not rely on queer stereotypes or stock characters. They create beautiful and dynamic images of communities either on or just under the surface. All of these artists display the clarity of vision and boldness of expression that are important to the work of making their communities visible and powerful. As they should be.

Photo: King Texas

On view June Dixon Place NYC. June 30 - August 22

Featuring work by Ana Benaroya, Zen Browne, Tinker Coalescing, Machine Dazzle, Sara Lautman, André Singleton and King Texas.

— 3 weeks ago with 172 notes
lalilster:


Call for Submissions: 
JOTAS: An Anthology of Queer Latina Voices


***DEADLINE EXTENDED TO JULY 15, 2014***
 
Dear Jotas: 
 
Recognizing the critical need for Queer Latina voices, we invite you to send us your poems, essays, stories, manifestos, love offerings, or rages against the machine. This anthology, to be published by Kórima Press, will be a queer Latina space of engagement that includes lesbianas, bisexuals, trans* people, marimachas, mariconas, dykes, etc.
 
We invite jotas writing from the heart. Tell us your desires, challenges, love, deceit and everything in between. We’re open to various literary genres, fiction, poetry, personal non-fiction, autoethnography, song lyrics, visual art. Entries may be in English, Spanish, Spanglish, or a mix thereof. 
 
Cuéntanos. Send us your corazón on paper. 
 
Jota Editors: 
T. Jackie Cuevas
Anel I. Flores
Candace Lopez
Rita Urquijo-Ruiz
 
Send submissions to: jota [at] korimapress.com
 
Attach a single Word (.doc or .docx) or Rich Text Format (.rtf) document containing the following:
- Contact Information
- 150 - 250 word bio
- A high-resolution photograph
- Up to 10 pages of poetry or prose (250 words per page, max)
- If you’re interested in submitting original artwork, send a high-resolution, black and white image for consideration. 
Please be sure to write the following in the subject line of the email: “Jota Submission: YourFullName”
 
Deadline: July 15, 2014
 
Compensation: As a small press, Kórima is unable to provide monetary compensation for submissions. Contributors will receive 3 copies of the anthology and will be able to purchase additional copies at-cost, to be determined upon publication. 
 
ABOUT THE EDITORS: 
T. Jackie Cuevas is a queer writer and professor who teaches in San Antonio, TX. 
 
Anel I. Flores is a Jota-Tejana, realtor, artivista and author of Empanada: a Lesbiana Story en Probaditas, living and working en San Anto.  
 
Candace Lopez is a creative writer, professional fundraiser in the non-profit world, and high femme living in Austin, Tejas.
 
Rita Urquijo-Ruiz is a professor-jota from the borderlands who lives and works in San Antonio, TX.
via  Kórima Press

lalilster:

Call for Submissions:

JOTAS: An Anthology of Queer Latina Voices

***DEADLINE EXTENDED TO JULY 15, 2014***

 

Dear Jotas:

 

Recognizing the critical need for Queer Latina voices, we invite you to send us your poems, essays, stories, manifestos, love offerings, or rages against the machine. This anthology, to be published by Kórima Press, will be a queer Latina space of engagement that includes lesbianas, bisexuals, trans* people, marimachas, mariconas, dykes, etc.

 

We invite jotas writing from the heart. Tell us your desires, challenges, love, deceit and everything in between. We’re open to various literary genres, fiction, poetry, personal non-fiction, autoethnography, song lyrics, visual art. Entries may be in English, Spanish, Spanglish, or a mix thereof.

 

Cuéntanos. Send us your corazón on paper.

 

Jota Editors:

T. Jackie Cuevas

Anel I. Flores

Candace Lopez

Rita Urquijo-Ruiz

 

Send submissions to: jota [at] korimapress.com

 

Attach a single Word (.doc or .docx) or Rich Text Format (.rtf) document containing the following:

- Contact Information

- 150 - 250 word bio

- A high-resolution photograph

- Up to 10 pages of poetry or prose (250 words per page, max)

- If you’re interested in submitting original artwork, send a high-resolution, black and white image for consideration.

Please be sure to write the following in the subject line of the email: “Jota Submission: YourFullName”

 

Deadline: July 15, 2014

 

Compensation: As a small press, Kórima is unable to provide monetary compensation for submissions. Contributors will receive 3 copies of the anthology and will be able to purchase additional copies at-cost, to be determined upon publication.

 

ABOUT THE EDITORS:

T. Jackie Cuevas is a queer writer and professor who teaches in San Antonio, TX.

 

Anel I. Flores is a Jota-Tejana, realtor, artivista and author of Empanada: a Lesbiana Story en Probaditas, living and working en San Anto.  

 

Candace Lopez is a creative writer, professional fundraiser in the non-profit world, and high femme living in Austin, Tejas.

 

Rita Urquijo-Ruiz is a professor-jota from the borderlands who lives and works in San Antonio, TX.

via  Kórima Press

(via enumerate)

— 3 weeks ago with 65 notes
feministlibrary:

Meg Allen “Butch-project”

feministlibrary:

Meg Allen “Butch-project”

— 2 months ago with 4 notes
Lalla Essaydi  Les Femmes du Maroc- Harem Women Writing, 2008 (ArtAsiaPacific: Writing Women Interview With Lalla Essaydi)

Lalla Essaydi  Les Femmes du Maroc- Harem Women Writing, 2008 (ArtAsiaPacific: Writing Women Interview With Lalla Essaydi)

— 3 months ago
#art  #calligraphy  #henna  #lalla essaydi  #WOC artists 
Lalla Essaydi. Les Femmes du Maroc #21B, 2006.

In your works, systems of power and domination, such as the male mastery of literature and calligraphy, are imposed on the photographed subjects. What are some of the contradictions and complexities that your work addresses?
I go to great lengths to make the text illegible. I want it to become a language of its own, appreciated in the same way as the figure. It doesn’t necessarily need to have a meaning. The whole work is my story and the story of these women. For me, [calligraphy] is important because it’s the writing style of the Quran, and because it’s a masculine art form I didn’t have access to growing up. Poetry, architecture and calligraphy have always been considered “high-art” in Islamic culture. By writing calligraphy with henna, a medium associated with women’s craft, I put the two together instead of pulling them apart.

(Writing Women Interview With Lalla Essaydi)

Lalla Essaydi. Les Femmes du Maroc #21B, 2006.

In your works, systems of power and domination, such as the male mastery of literature and calligraphy, are imposed on the photographed subjects. What are some of the contradictions and complexities that your work addresses?

I go to great lengths to make the text illegible. I want it to become a language of its own, appreciated in the same way as the figure. It doesn’t necessarily need to have a meaning. The whole work is my story and the story of these women. For me, [calligraphy] is important because it’s the writing style of the Quran, and because it’s a masculine art form I didn’t have access to growing up. Poetry, architecture and calligraphy have always been considered “high-art” in Islamic culture. By writing calligraphy with henna, a medium associated with women’s craft, I put the two together instead of pulling them apart.

(Writing Women Interview With Lalla Essaydi)

— 3 months ago with 2 notes
#art  #lalla essaydi  #Artist Interview  #WOC artists  #calligraphy 

Mickalene Thomas and Deirdre Logue in Conversation at the 2013 Reel Artists Film Festival (by Canadian Art)

— 3 months ago
Austin Chronicle review of Laurie Frick ‘Quantify-me’ by Wayne Alan Brenner | Jan 27, 2012 |
You can track just about everything you do in your life these days, using the Internet via computer or cell phone apps to generate charts of what you did, with whom, how much, where, when, and everything but why.
“Why?” is the question most often left to artists and philosophers, and the best answer is frequently “Why not?” Laurie Frick, on the other hand – the hand holding the pen and ink and glue and paper and so on – makes art from those very charts and tallies and what tech types like to call metrics. Frick takes her recorded and measured life and transforms it into visual representations made of thousands of laminate counter-top samples, of intricate collage, of thick laser-cut paper hangings that fill the middle interior of Women & Their Work for this one-woman show called “Quantify Me.” It’s a one-woman self-portrait show, specifically, because that’s the artist herself you’re looking at, made evident in visualizations of how much she slept each night, how much food she ate, how many calories burned, how many places visited, what her daily moods have been, and more.
Much of what we are, as R. Buckminster Fuller suggested of himself, is a verb; and here the relentless human verb has been transmogrified into the concrete noun. You’re not just looking at parts of the quantifiable Frick, though, you’re actually walking through the artist’s data-centric incarnation as the cut-paper hangings form a many-layered maze in the midst of the gallery, the lacunae of each chart providing peepholes through which you can view the other charts, the collages, the other visitors, that one main wall completely covered with staggering spectra of laminate samples. (via LAURIE FRICK | press)

Austin Chronicle review of Laurie Frick ‘Quantify-me’ by Wayne Alan Brenner | Jan 27, 2012 |

You can track just about everything you do in your life these days, using the Internet via computer or cell phone apps to generate charts of what you did, with whom, how much, where, when, and everything but why.

“Why?” is the question most often left to artists and philosophers, and the best answer is frequently “Why not?” Laurie Frick, on the other hand – the hand holding the pen and ink and glue and paper and so on – makes art from those very charts and tallies and what tech types like to call metrics. Frick takes her recorded and measured life and transforms it into visual representations made of thousands of laminate counter-top samples, of intricate collage, of thick laser-cut paper hangings that fill the middle interior of Women & Their Work for this one-woman show called “Quantify Me.” It’s a one-woman self-portrait show, specifically, because that’s the artist herself you’re looking at, made evident in visualizations of how much she slept each night, how much food she ate, how many calories burned, how many places visited, what her daily moods have been, and more.

Much of what we are, as R. Buckminster Fuller suggested of himself, is a verb; and here the relentless human verb has been transmogrified into the concrete noun. You’re not just looking at parts of the quantifiable Frick, though, you’re actually walking through the artist’s data-centric incarnation as the cut-paper hangings form a many-layered maze in the midst of the gallery, the lacunae of each chart providing peepholes through which you can view the other charts, the collages, the other visitors, that one main wall completely covered with staggering spectra of laminate samples. (via LAURIE FRICK | press)

— 3 months ago
#this is fascinating  #laurie frick  #self surveillance  #art  #reviews  #quantify me 
(via LAURIE FRICK | art…and experiments in self-tracking) “Daily Time Slices” 40 in x 48″, 21 days of daily activities coded by color and duration.

(via LAURIE FRICK | art…and experiments in self-tracking)
“Daily Time Slices” 40 in x 48″, 21 days of daily activities coded by color and duration.

— 3 months ago
#laurie frick  #art  #self tracking  #quantifying life  #selfies 

lauriefrick:

Time sleeping is a lot like time during the day, it’s all sliced up into bits. #quantifiedself - 1 is awake, 2 is REM, 4 is deep sleep, and #3 light sleep, aka trash sleep is all folded up. 12” x 12”, watercolor and ink on paper. “Sleeping in Pink”.

— 3 months ago with 2 notes